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Thinking Its Presence 2017 has ended
Events from 9:00am to 5:00pm are open only to registered attendees. Please register before October 9, 2017 at https://universityofarizonapoetrycenter.submittable.com/submit/81274/pre-registration-thinking-its-presence-2017-conference-university-of-arizon. For more information, please visit https://poetry.arizona.edu/TIP2017.
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Thursday, October 19
 

8:00am

During Breaks: Othering (collected) by Beth Weinstein and Ana Martínez
Othering (collected)  explores social, political, and spatial othering produced by texts, manifest as enclosures and borders, through creative practices, social engagement, performance and installation. 

Othering is instigated by our research about the internment during WWII of Japanese Americans—in so-called “relocation centers” such as Poston and Gila on Arizona Tribal lands and in Tucson’s former Federal Honor Camp—and the echoing of those historical events in current executive orders that threaten to other citizens, residents and visitors. While Tucson’s prison once held conscientious objectors, little remains today as a historical trace of it or many of the other camps. These were brought into being by President Roosevelt’s 1942 Executive Orders 9066 and 9102 to exclude certain unnamed members of the population from “sensitive” areas.
Our intention, through Othering, is to foreground past blurring of truths, states of anxiety, and misguided judgements that resonate with our current socio-political context. Othering invites conference participants and the public to enter into dialogue during the duration of the event at a pop-up en-counter located in the Poetry Center’s covered patio and/or by digitally collaborating through a website. The dialogue centers around historical and current documents related to equality or racial othering (i.e. executive orders, constitution and amendments, testimonials, tweets and poems). During conference breaks and lunch, participants can select pithy passages or words that resonate or are of concern. We will collect hand redacted, edited, annotated and highlighted prints, digital responses and voice recordings sent back at us. These contributions will construct our ephemeral and performative archive.
At each day’s end, in order to reflect the community’s concerns, questions, curiosity, hopes, and fears, we will make visible a selection of that day’s archive through light and projection in the Poetry Center’s exterior space.

Speakers
avatar for Ana Martínez

Ana Martínez

Performance Scholar & Designer
Ana Martínez, PhD is a performance scholar and designer. Her creations foreground scenography as a medium for social comment, and have been shown in the US, England, Germany, and Mexico. Her chapter about the 2001 march by the Zapatistas to the Zócalo is included in Performan... Read More →
avatar for Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein

Assoc Prof of Architecture, University of Arizona, USA
Beth Weinstein works at the seam between architecture and performance, across scales from drawing to installation, to urban and landscape interventions. Her doctoral project  (University of Tasmania) explores “Spatial Labour: Manifesting the hidden in architectural (un/re)making.&rdquo... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Poetry Center exterior spaces

8:30am

Complimentary coffee
Please join us for coffee/tea! Come on in through the Poetry Center library and exit into the garden through the back door, straight ahead of you as you enter the library. (Reminder: no food or drink allowed in the Poetry Center building; enjoy your hot beverages in the garden only! Thank you for helping us protect our collection.)

Thursday October 19, 2017 8:30am - 11:30am
Poetry Center Meditation Garden

9:00am

Asian American Subjectives: The History and Development of Asian American Literature

Asian American Subjectivities

Event type: Panel/Discussion

 The great Filipino novelist and revolutionary José Rizal, while he was studying medicine and philosophy in Madrid, wrote a letter to a friend in 1883, in which he described native Spanish reactions to his presence at their universities:

 “they called me Chinese, Japanese, American [that is, Latin American], etc., but not one Filipino! Unfortunate country—nobody knows a thing about you!”

Unfortunate: and yet, there are certain benefits to nobody knowing a thing about you. Benedict Anderson, writing about this letter in The Age of Globalization, notes that this misidentification is not experienced by Rizal as a great pain or a lack. The ignorance around him, compared to the rigid racial hierarchy of the colony, is liberating instead. Back home Indios like himself found themselves, alongside Chinos, as racially inferior to the Filipinos, which at the time referred specifically to people of Spanish descent living in the Phillipines.

“In Spain, however, Rizal and his fellow students quickly discovered that these distinctions were either unknown or seen as irrelevant. No matter what their status was back home, here they were all filipinos, just as the Latin Americans in Madrid in the late eighteenth century were americanos, no matter if they were from Lima or Cartagena, or if they were creoles or of mixed ancestry. (The same process has produced the contemporary American categories “Asians,” and “Asian Americans”.)”

Asians in America used to be subject to this process, anyway: having come to America as mostly Chinese, Japanese and Filipino, widespread ignorance, fear and hatred resulted in a process of racialization whereby the previously distinct communities could come together to discuss what it was they had in common. Through this process “Asian America” was invented.

Asian America’s long afterlife outside of the immediate moment of its necessity speaks to its emotional resonance. It’s a dream of a shared culture in the face of oppression. In a way, the concept is utopian. Today we are many decades into its dissolution into a demographic category, a term of description. What is its use for those populations who did not experience the specific collective alienation of those who invented the term but found ourselves clothed in it anyways? Is it still a political term, and in what way is it political?

Furthermore, the application of the created demographic of “Asian American” has its continued impact and consequences -- upon the demographic as both artificial and organic whole -- on the political, educational, cultural, institutional development of Asian America. Jennifer Lee and Min Zhou, in “The Success Frame and Achievement Paradox: The Costs and Consequences for Asian Americans,” write that “Applying the concept of frames to our research, we find that 1.5- and second-generation Chinese and Vietnamese respondents framed ‘a good education’ similarly, despite the dissimilar educational backgrounds of their immigrant parents.”

 

 

Though Asian American identity has stabilized - or at least, demographically, appears to have stabilized - the cultural and institutional processes which created it churn along, albeit in different ways. Literature was then and remains today the machine through which new subjectivities are developed and put to the test. We propose to discuss with the attendees the how history of Asian American literature built up the subjectivities which made something like Asian America possible and new subjectivities being developed by Asian American writers today.


Moderators
avatar for Mai Nguyen Do

Mai Nguyen Do

Founder & Executive Editor, Rambutan Literary
Do Nguyen Mai – name written family name to middle name to first name – is a Vietnamese American poet and advocate for Vietnamese American progress. She is the founder of Rambutan Literary, the co-founder of CA25 United for Progress, and the author of Ghosts Still Walking.

Speakers
avatar for Mai Nguyen Do

Mai Nguyen Do

Founder & Executive Editor, Rambutan Literary
Do Nguyen Mai – name written family name to middle name to first name – is a Vietnamese American poet and advocate for Vietnamese American progress. She is the founder of Rambutan Literary, the co-founder of CA25 United for Progress, and the author of Ghosts Still Walking.
avatar for Tyler Nguyen

Tyler Nguyen

Tyler Nguyen is a designer and occasional contributor to Hanoi-based AJAR press.
avatar for Bryan Thao Worra

Bryan Thao Worra

Correspondent, Innsmouth Free Press
"Why march to the beat of a different drummer when you can rumba?" | | A Laotian American poet and transcultural adoptee, I work actively to support Laotian, Hmong and Southeast Asian artists and writers around the world. | | I am the author of the books BARROW, On The... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Poetry Center Conference Room 207 Poetry Center

9:00am

Decolonizing the Archive: Examining the Liminal Space between Experience and Reality
Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Sara Sams

Sara Sams

Instructor, Arizona State University
I'm a poet from Oak Ridge, TN. I earned a B.A. (English , Spanish) from Davidson College in 2008 and a M.F.A. from Arizona State University in 2013. I'm currently working as an Instructor at ASU, where I teach L2 learners. I often use translation activities in the classroom. I s... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Education North

9:00am

Innovation And Embodiment In Contemporary African American Poetics

Innovation and Embodiment in Contemporary African American Poetics

Panel Abstract

“For the master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house”
-Audre Lorde

This panel represents a range of poetry and poetics projects by graduate students and faculty at the University of Texas, Austin. Home to one of the nation’s premiere MFA programs, UT-Austin is the site of a thriving community of poet-scholars that refuses the divide between critics and artists that often divides English departments.  The work represented on this panel engages the intersections of race and language with a focus on innovation in contemporary poetry.  In light of this year’s theme “The Ephemeral Archive,” the proposed papers explore aspects of tradition/experimentation, form/deformation, and embodiment/performance with the intent to trace, recover, challenge and/or reimagine. Although the panelists approach the capacious subject of ephemerality differently, each engages the conference’s call to rigorously reckon with received, lived, and creatively-crafted epistemologies by artists of color.  Jeffrey Boruszak engages the work of one of this year’s keynote speakers, Douglas Kearney. He pays particular attention to Kearney’s typographical innovation and argues that the poet’s form of “ekoustic” writing, a style that captures the dynamism of post-soul performance, likewise holds within it the powers of cultural critique and knowledge making. Where Kearney’s typographically distinct poems resound loudly on the page, Harryette Mullen’s tanka verses are deceptively quiet; however, the tanka’s brief and ordinary nature belie their scope and impact. Rebecca Macmillan finds that Mullen’s daily and quotidian archival writing  practice brings into relief urgent social crises such as environmental destruction and systemic inequalities based on race and class. Likewise, Sequoia Maner examines the artist’s role as documenter, archivist, and storyteller.  She examines how writer-rapper Kendrick Lamar revives and embodies the late Tupac Shakur as a symbol of social dissent and, moreover, provides an aesthetic counterpart to #BlackLivesMatter public policy-minded aims. Although she engages modes of analysis outside of academia, she too foregrounds the poetics of Tupac’s sonic resurrection. Lisa L. Moore’s paper aims to redirect and expand conversations about Lorde’s work to include her innovative, “sonnet-like” strategies and thereby, remove the author from the “prism of autobiography” she has thus far been relegated to. Our panel chair is CantoMundo founder and former UT faculty member Deborah Paredez--a scholar-poet whose work on black and latina/x performance examines the intersections of race, queerness, performance, and writing.

Together, the panelists aim to tackle a range of questions that, at their roots, signal the desire for futurity. How must we remember Lorde and will we have done her work deserved justice? How do hip-hop aesthetes both honor and critique a nostalgic past in moving toward new visions of being in the world? How does one cultivate a creative practice of mindfulness and what might one do with that in the world? In thinking through these questions, the panelists confront the lingering and urgent crises that continue to shape and constrain lives of the most vulnerable of our society: institutional and interpersonal violence, social protest and social justice, misrepresentation and erasure. The panelists present a group of artists--Audre Lorde, Douglas Kearney, Harryette Mullen, and Kendrick Lamar--who together, provide the languages and tools needed for dismantling and rebuilding. How marvelous.

 

 


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Kyle Boruszak

Jeffrey Kyle Boruszak

PhD Candidate, University of Texas at Austin


Thursday October 19, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Vine Annex 1125 N. Vine. Ave., Tucson AZ

9:00am

Talks, Temporalities, and Explorations
Moderators
avatar for Anita Huslin

Anita Huslin

Anita Rivera Huslin is an award-winning editor, reporter and writer at such news organizations as NPR, The New York Times and The Washington Post, where she was a Pulitzer Prize finalist and wrote, among other subjects, about the intersection of business and the economy and minor... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Anita Huslin

Anita Huslin

Anita Rivera Huslin is an award-winning editor, reporter and writer at such news organizations as NPR, The New York Times and The Washington Post, where she was a Pulitzer Prize finalist and wrote, among other subjects, about the intersection of business and the economy and minor... Read More →
avatar for Joy Katz

Joy Katz

Joy Katz's third collection of poems, All You Do is Perceive (Four Way Books), was named one of the best books of 2013 by the Kansas City Star. Her honors include a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, a Wallace Stegner fellowship, a Pushcart prize, and a 2014 Professional Artist grant from the Pittsburgh Foundation for her work-in-progress, Frayed, about race and voice. She teaches in the MFA program at... Read More →
NO

Nicole Oxendine

Is an interdisciplinary artist, activist & cultural producer, I express through visual art (textile assemblage, painting & site/context-responsive installations), community-engaged practice, poetry & collaborative cultural production. Listening & following the creative whisper... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Poetry Center Library

9:00am

Preserving Cultural Legacies: Readings From No Others, Refugeed and Remembrance

Event Description

Readings from three works produced by Aquarius Press, an independent press specializing in underrepresented authors and artists. Founded in 1999, the press has two major divisions:  Willow Books (now in its 10th year) and the newly-formed AUXmedia. Willow Books develops, publishes and promotes many of the nation’s top poets and writers of color, and AUXmedia presents nontraditional work in multimedia formats.

Sokunthary Svay is the author of a forthcoming poetry collection, No Others (Willow Books, 2017), which memorializes the largely untold stories and legacy of Khmer Rouge-era Cambodia. Svay is a Pushcart-nominated Khmer writer and musician from the Bronx, New York. Her writing credits include an essays anthologized in Homelands: Women’s Journeys Across Race, Place and Time, FLESH, The Postpartum Year, Women’s Studies Quarterly, Blue Lyra Review, Newtown Literary, Mekong Review, and Emotive Fruition. She was the 2016 Willow Arts Alliance Residency Fellow and a recipient of the First Friday Residency at the Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning. Her poem “Morning Song” was recently set to music and had a world premiere at the Queens New Music Festival. Svay’s family were refugees from Cambodia after surviving the genocidal Khmer Rouge regime.

Reginald Flood’s forthcoming Refugeed (Willow Books, 2017) is a narrative poetry collection based on the oral histories of African Americans  who were enslaved during the most tragic era of American history. Refugeed contains authentic Works Progress Administration (WPA) transcriptions collected during the Roosevelt era. Flood was inspired by the interviewees who answered questions from “strangers representing a government agency about their enslavement with bravery and dignity.” Flood is a recent NEA Fellow in Creative Writing who received a Walker Fellowship from the Provincetown Fine Arts Center. His poems have appeared in The Ringing Ear: Black Poets Lean South, Cave Canem X Anniversary Collection, Massachusetts Review, African American Review and Mythium. Flood is a Cave Canem fellow and teaches composition, African American literature and creative writing at Eastern Connecticut State University. Flood was also the editor and scholarly consultant for Remembrance (AUXmedia, 2016-2019), a multimedia and cross-disciplinary collaborative preservation project on the WWI-era African American performers and scholars who were involved in the creation of the Harlem Hellfighters Band.

Heather Buchanan is the founder of Aquarius Press and Executive Producer for Remembrance. She is a Digital Humanities scholar and the 2017 Paul Charosh Fellow for the Society for American Music. She is the Director of the Paradise Valley Idlewild Digital Resource, which utilizes technology to preserve the cultural legacies of two rapidly-vanishing African American historic districts in Michigan. She is the Co-Director of the Willow Arts Alliance, which presents readings and workshops for writers of color in culturally significant locales in the U.S.

***
All three readings embody this conference’s thematic issues of race, creativity, interdisciplinarity and cultural legacies. Having lived in a refugee camp and then later in the projects of New York City, Sokunthary Svay’s reading will demonstrate the depth of deeply instilled cultural legacies and the power of literature to give voice to a people’s history of violence and displacement. Flood’s reading will illuminate the shameful past of slavery-era America, but in an inventive way that turns the tables on how this story is told. Flood’s work gives voice to a people who have been missing from the discussion of “what really happened.” Blending authentic WWI narratives with poetry and prose, Buchanan’s Remembrance gives voice to African American men and women who—despite their world-changing contributions to the Allied victory in WWI— have literally been left out of the history books. All three readings, while steeped in history, also chronicle the far-reaching personal and collective legacies in the present day. Reginald Flood states it best: “After studying hundreds of these transcriptions from a historical place of privilege I recognize the powerful gift these narratives provide a tangible, material connection to my own past. These words reinforce my gratitude for the fortitude of relatives from that generation whose stories fired my imagination and carved out my aesthetic.” 

 


Moderators
avatar for Sokunthary Svay

Sokunthary Svay

Founder and Board President, Cambodian American Literary Arts Association (CALAA)
Southeast Asian American diaspora, Khmer American narratives, refugee writing, challenging the white narratives of war in Southeast Asia, POC teacher in Freshman Composition, the Bronx, NYC, classical music, opera, deep house music

Speakers
avatar for Sokunthary Svay

Sokunthary Svay

Founder and Board President, Cambodian American Literary Arts Association (CALAA)
Southeast Asian American diaspora, Khmer American narratives, refugee writing, challenging the white narratives of war in Southeast Asia, POC teacher in Freshman Composition, the Bronx, NYC, classical music, opera, deep house music


Thursday October 19, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Poetry Center Classroom 205 (Alumni Room) Poetry Center

11:00am

Archival Bodies Through Theory and Practice
(We moved it from 4pm to 11am--panelists let me know if this is okay!)

Moderators
avatar for Andrea Gutierrez

Andrea Gutierrez

Writer, Editor, Educator

Speakers

Thursday October 19, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Poetry Center Classroom 205 (Alumni Room) Poetry Center

11:00am

Refusals for Sight, Breath, Sound: The Occupation of Palestine

Visual Occupation/s: The Image & Palestine

 

Dalia Ebed (Moderator), Khaled Jarrar (Panelist), Robert Yerachmiel Sniderman (Panelist)

 

Khaled Jarrar’s work is internationally recognized for its concern with radical intersections of daily life in the occupied territories and visual culture. His body as such an artist has been censored from appearing publicly at openings, and some of his projects, such as “Through the Spectrum,” have been co-opted by the international media to perpetuate harmful narratives of the social spaces he is trying to document and fight from. Robert Yerachmiel Sniderman, as an emerging artist and thinker, identifies with the movement of young Jews in the United States actively trying to disrupt U.S. American organizational and community denial of the occupation. Both artists are working through this panel on the question of the image, or what scholar Gil Z. Hochberg calls “visual occupations;” Khaled from within the very geopolitical and embodied circumstances of the occupation, and Robert as one both committed to working as a Jewish artist while forming solidarity with the Palestinian struggle for freedom and dignity, enabling an intercultural critique of subjugation, wherein the presenters’ very bodies are implicated by each other’s arguments. 

 


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Robert Yerachmiel Snyderman

Robert Yerachmiel Snyderman

Robert Yerachmiel Snyderman is a consultant for the Jewish History Museum in Tucson, where he directs the museum’s education program and has helped curate temporary and permanent pieces on human rights, Jewish identity, and local histories that complicate and challenge dominant... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Poetry Center Conference Room 207 Poetry Center

11:00am

11:00am

11:00am

1:00pm

Lunch Break
Food truck on site from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm: Nations Creations

Thursday October 19, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
TBA

2:00pm

Special TIP Board meeting for TIP BOARD MEMBERS
Meeting for TIP Board members

Speakers
avatar for Vidhu Aggarwal

Vidhu Aggarwal

Associate Professor, Rollins College
Born in Ranchi, India, Vidhu Aggarwal grew up in the Southern U.S., primarily in Louisiana and Texas. Her multi-media works in video, poetry, and scholarship are oriented around Bollywood spectacle, carnival, and science fiction. Her poems appeared in the top 25 of 2016 in Boston Review. Her collection of poems The Trouble with Humpdori (2016) received the Editor's Choice Prize from The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective, was a handpicked selection with Small Press Distribution, and was selected by Sundress Publications as one of the best books of 2016. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Black Warrior Review, Chicago Quarterly Review, Juked, [PANK], Pedestal, Sugar House Review, INK BRICK, Project As [I] Am... Read More →
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart's Traffic (Arktoi Books) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press; AK Press) and Here is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities. Their work has appeared in The Best American Experimental Writing, The... Read More →
avatar for Anita Huslin

Anita Huslin

Anita Rivera Huslin is an award-winning editor, reporter and writer at such news organizations as NPR, The New York Times and The Washington Post, where she was a Pulitzer Prize finalist and wrote, among other subjects, about the intersection of business and the economy and minor... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Jarrett

Lisa Jarrett

Assistant Professor of Community and Context Arts, Portland State University
Lisa Jarrett was born in 1977 in Morristown, New Jersey. Growing up as a Black American who moved with her family to various, often conflicting political climates in cities in Texas, Minnesota, and New York, the influences of her upbringing in a post-Civil Rights and increasingly so-called “post-racial” America are apparent in her work, which seeks to confront ideas of racial difference and perceptions of racial equality. | | Though conflating comparisons of self and Other within a racial context are surely not limited to the American Black Experience and can be examined in myriad global racial milieus, Jarrett’s work is typically centered upon deconstructing, defragmenting, and, in turn, reconstructing and reassembling her personal experiences as a Black woman in America into a visual expression that asks viewers to consider their own roles in present-day race relations. | | Jarrett maintains a studio in Portland, Oregon, where she continues to teach classes in art at Portland State University's School of Art + Design. She exhibits nationally and currently has work in... Read More →
avatar for Ruth-Ellen Kocher

Ruth-Ellen Kocher

Professor and Divisional Dean for Arts and Humanities, University of Colorado- Boulder
Ruth Ellen Kocher is the author of seven books, most recently Third Voice (Tupelo Press, 2016), nominated for the 2017 Hurston/Wright Legacy Awards, Ending in Planes (Noemi Press, 2014), Goodbye Lyric: The Gigans and Lovely Gun (Sheep Meadow Press, 2014), domina Un/blued (Tupelo... Read More →
avatar for Farid Matuk

Farid Matuk

Assistant Professor, University of Arizona
avatar for Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith recently co-edited the anthology Angels of the Americplyse: New Latin@ Writing (Counterpath, 2014). Her most recent poetry collection, Milk and Filth was a finalist for the NBCC. A CantoMundo Fellow, she is the publisher of Noemi Press. Her newest colle... Read More →
avatar for Lehua Taitano

Lehua Taitano

Lehua M. Taitano, a native Chamoru from Yigo, Guåhan (Guam), is a queer writer and interdisciplinary artist. She is the author of A Bell Made of Stones (poems, TinFish Press) a chapbook of short fiction, appalachiapacific, winner of the 2010 Merriam-Frontier Award, and a chapb... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
TBA

2:00pm

Against the Diversity Machine: Moving Beyond the Literary Complex
Moderators
Speakers
avatar for jayy dodd

jayy dodd

jayy dodd is a blxk trans femme from los angeles, california– now based on the internet. they are a professional writer & literary editor. their work has appeared / will appear in Broadly, The Establishment, Entropy, LitHub, BOAAT Press, Duende, & Nashville Review among others... Read More →
avatar for Dan Lau

Dan Lau

Dan Lau is a recipient of a Kundiman Fellowship, a William Dickey Fellowship, an Archie D. and Bertha Walker Scholarship from the FAWC in Provincetown, and an Individual Artist Commission from the San Francisco Arts Commission. He holds degrees from Hunter College of The City Uni... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Poetry Center Classroom 205 (Alumni Room) Poetry Center

2:00pm

Deconstructing Race, Deconstructing Identity

Deconstructing Race, Deconstructing Identity

How do writers populate a world of their creation with racially marked bodies in a way that thoughtfully and meaningfully engages with the very question of how racial identities are constructed? The writers on this panel have all considered this question, and in addressing “the relationship among aesthetics, politics, and representation” in literature, we offer rigorous creative experimentations that challenge, critique, and embody racial discourse.

These panelists have modeled their work on the fictions of acclaimed writers like George Schuyler, Toni Morrison, Bernardine Evaristo, Jess Row, and A. Igoni Barrett. Rather than limiting ourselves to the question of who gets to write what, the writers on this panel ask the following questions: What is race? How does it operate? What can imaginative literary texts reveal about our shifting notions of race, over time and space, and through narrative?

To support this inquiry—and in conversation with scholar-critics like Frantz Fanon, Toni Morrison, Omi and Winant, and Patricia Hill Collins—the panelists use deconstructive modes for identifying and practicing narrative strategies and craft techniques that grapple with constructions of race, ethnicity, and intersectional identities.

We hope that by sharing and discussing our creative and critical experimentations, we can foment a discussion that engages with the ways that history, genre, textual and creative practices, and representation may inform how we engage with racial identity in creative writing.


Moderators
avatar for Julie Iromuanya

Julie Iromuanya

Assistant Professor, University of Arizona
JULIE IROMUANYA is the author of Mr. and Mrs. Doctor (Coffee House Press), a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award, the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction, the Etisalat Prize for Literature, and the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize for Debut Fiction. Her scholarly-critical work is forthcoming in Meridians, Callaloo, and Afropolitan Literature as World Literature. She was the inaugural Herbert W. Martin Fellow in Creative Writing at the University of Dayton. She has also been a Jane Tinkham Broughton Fellow in Fiction at Bread Loaf Writers Conference, a Tennessee Williams Scholar at the Sewanee Writers Conference, a Bread Loaf Bakeless / Camargo France Fellow, a Brown Foundation Fellow at the Dora Maar House, and a Jan Michalski Fellow at... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Danielle Geller

Danielle Geller

MIT Libraries
avatar for Julie Iromuanya

Julie Iromuanya

Assistant Professor, University of Arizona
JULIE IROMUANYA is the author of Mr. and Mrs. Doctor (Coffee House Press), a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award, the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction, the Etisalat Prize for Literature, and the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize for Debut Fiction. Her scholarly-critical work is forthcoming in Meridians, Callaloo, and Afropolitan Literature as World Literature. She was the inaugural Herbert W. Martin Fellow in Creative Writing at the University of Dayton. She has also been a Jane Tinkham Broughton Fellow in Fiction at Bread Loaf Writers Conference, a Tennessee Williams Scholar at the Sewanee Writers Conference, a Bread Loaf Bakeless / Camargo France Fellow, a Brown Foundation Fellow at the Dora Maar House, and a Jan Michalski Fellow at... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Poetry Center Library

2:00pm

Giving Up the Ghost: An Exploration of Diasporic Counter-Memory and a Pedagogy of Sibilant Citizenship in the Age of Climate Crisis
Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Murktarat Yussef

Murktarat Yussef

Ph.D. Student in Communication, University of California, San Diego


Thursday October 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Vine Annex 1125 N. Vine. Ave., Tucson AZ

2:00pm

Hope, Urgency, and Conversation: Parents Reading and Writing the Racially-Conscious Ecopoetic
Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Wendy S. Walters

Wendy S. Walters

Author, MULTIPLY/DIVDE: ON THE AMERICAN REAL AND SURREAL
Wendy S. Walters is the author of a book of prose, Multiply/Divide: On the American Real and Surreal (Sarabande Books, 2015), named a best book of the year by Buzzfeed, Flavorwire, Literary Hub, The Root, and Huffington Post. She is also the author of two books of poems, Troy, Michigan (Futurepoem, 2014) and Longer I Wait, More You Love Me. She has been awarded fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow in Poetry, The Ford Foundation, The Smithsonian Institution, Bread Loaf, The MacDowell Colony, and Yaddo. Her work appears in Bookforum, FENCE... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Education North

2:00pm

Pressure Points in the Language Contract: Interdisciplinary Text-based Performance
EVENT TITLE:
Pressure Points in the Language Contract: Interdisciplinary Text-based Performance

EVENT DESCRIPTION
The performance of a text is in many cases embodied, enacted, and inhabited by the physical body of the artist. This quality of performance text, then, presents an important and exciting space through which to explore non-binary positions regarding race and gender, as well as the role of hybrid and interdisciplinary texts in breaking out of traditional customs of art, literature, and society. Each writer will perform a selection of their work that speaks to these concerns.
  
STATEMENT OF MERIT
Our panel gathers writers who have written books of poetry, prose, and other hybrid texts, and who also have a practice of engaging text in unique modes of performance. Panelists are writers of mixed race, ethnicity, and/or gender who work in multiple terrains of art and culture-making including dance, film, music, multi-media, and site-specific performance. They share a vision as to how art can open up new models of thinking and being that are accessible to all.

Moderators
avatar for Violet Harlo

Violet Harlo

Performancer
Shape-shifting and genre-bending, Violet Harlo is a transdisciplinary, gender queer performancer who weaves together poetry, sound, movement, sculpture, drawing, mapping, and video into live works of art. Violet’s staged performance work explores the dynamic and intersectional... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Violet Harlo

Violet Harlo

Performancer
Shape-shifting and genre-bending, Violet Harlo is a transdisciplinary, gender queer performancer who weaves together poetry, sound, movement, sculpture, drawing, mapping, and video into live works of art. Violet’s staged performance work explores the dynamic and intersectional... Read More →
avatar for Sawako Nakayasu

Sawako Nakayasu

Assistant Professor, Brown University
Sawako Nakayasu is a transnational poet, translator, and occasional performance artist who has lived in Japan, France, China, and the US. Her books include The Ants (Les Figues Press, 2014), Texture Notes (Letter Machine Editions, 2010), and the translation of The Collected Poems of Chika Sagawa (Canarium Books, 2015), as well as unconventional translations such as Costume en Face (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2015), a handwritten notebook of Tatsumi... Read More →
avatar for Jason Magabo Perez

Jason Magabo Perez

Assistant Professor of English, Cal State San Bernardino
Jason Magabo Perez is the author of two hybrid collections of poetry & prose: a chapbook, PHENOMENOLOGY OF SUPERHERO (Red Bird Chapbooks, 2016); & a full-length debut, THIS IS FOR THE MOSTLESS (WordTech Editions, 2017). Perez’s writing has appeared in Witness, TAYO, vitriol, El... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Poetry Center Conference Room 207 Poetry Center

4:00pm

Post Traumatic Lit Disorder: Writing as Performance Against Silence
Moderators
avatar for Sokunthary Svay

Sokunthary Svay

Founder and Board President, Cambodian American Literary Arts Association (CALAA)
Southeast Asian American diaspora, Khmer American narratives, refugee writing, challenging the white narratives of war in Southeast Asia, POC teacher in Freshman Composition, the Bronx, NYC, classical music, opera, deep house music

Speakers
CL

Cathy Linh Che

Executive Director, Kundiman
Kundiman is dedicated to the creation, cultivation, and promotion of Asian American literature.
avatar for Sokunthary Svay

Sokunthary Svay

Founder and Board President, Cambodian American Literary Arts Association (CALAA)
Southeast Asian American diaspora, Khmer American narratives, refugee writing, challenging the white narratives of war in Southeast Asia, POC teacher in Freshman Composition, the Bronx, NYC, classical music, opera, deep house music


Thursday October 19, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

4:00pm

The Anxiety of Influence: A Conversation About Documentation Across Generations
Moderators
avatar for Rachel Mindell

Rachel Mindell

Marketing Team, Submittable
Rachel Mindell works at Submittable and is a Writing the Community Resident for the UA Poetry Center. She is the author of Like a Teardrop and a Bullet (Dancing Girl Press) and rib and instep: honey (forthcoming from above/ground). Individual poems have appeared (or will) in DIA... Read More →

Speakers

Thursday October 19, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Poetry Center Classroom 205 (Alumni Room) Poetry Center

4:00pm

What If? The Power of Speculation
Moderators
avatar for Wendy S. Walters

Wendy S. Walters

Author, MULTIPLY/DIVDE: ON THE AMERICAN REAL AND SURREAL
Wendy S. Walters is the author of a book of prose, Multiply/Divide: On the American Real and Surreal (Sarabande Books, 2015), named a best book of the year by Buzzfeed, Flavorwire, Literary Hub, The Root, and Huffington Post. She is also the author of two books of poems, Troy, Michigan (Futurepoem, 2014) and Longer I Wait, More You Love Me. She has been awarded fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow in Poetry, The Ford Foundation, The Smithsonian Institution, Bread Loaf, The MacDowell Colony, and Yaddo. Her work appears in Bookforum, FENCE... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Wendy S. Walters

Wendy S. Walters

Author, MULTIPLY/DIVDE: ON THE AMERICAN REAL AND SURREAL
Wendy S. Walters is the author of a book of prose, Multiply/Divide: On the American Real and Surreal (Sarabande Books, 2015), named a best book of the year by Buzzfeed, Flavorwire, Literary Hub, The Root, and Huffington Post. She is also the author of two books of poems, Troy, Michigan (Futurepoem, 2014) and Longer I Wait, More You Love Me. She has been awarded fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow in Poetry, The Ford Foundation, The Smithsonian Institution, Bread Loaf, The MacDowell Colony, and Yaddo. Her work appears in Bookforum, FENCE... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Poetry Center Conference Room 207 Poetry Center

4:00pm

Disrupting and Dismantling Dis-Content

Title:  Disrupting and Dismantling Dis-content: performances and a panel discussion

Event description:

Disrupting and Dismantling Dis-content is a performance/presentation with a panel discussion that presents the work of Peggy Robles-Alvarado, Nicholson Billey, Alexandria Johnson, and Feng Jiang and is moderated by Julia Steinmetz. Through performance and presentation, Disrupting and Dismantling Dis-content intends to challenge the conventionalized aesthetics and content of identity based performance by cultivating minoritarian modes of self-presentation.  Acknowledging the exhaustion that results from perpetually shouldering the burden of representation, we take up disidentification as a point of departure for survival and flourishing.

Statement of Merit:

Disrupting and Dismantling Dis-content as a performance/presentation is centered in the intersectional practices and performance perspectives of four MFA candidates from the inaugural class of the Performance + Performance Studies program at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. These artists perform their dis-content by elaborating performative art-based spaces within academic and artistic discourses related to their creative, theoretical, and methodological work. As a pedagogical unit, this panel demonstrates a particular legacy of José Esteban Muñoz’s practice of teaching: one in which the evidentiary status of ephemera is taken as a given, where we birth new worlds by means of disidentificatory performance, and where the medium of our mutual transformation is nothing less than love. 


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Feng Jiang 江峰

Feng Jiang 江峰

Performance and Performance Studies MFA, Pratt Institute
Feng Jiang is a dancer, writer, singer and actor. He obtained his BA in English and Chinese literature from National Taiwan University. As the 2015 recipient of the Government Fellowship for Studying Abroad from the R.O.C. government, he has resided in the U.S. since August 2016... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Poetry Center Library

4:00pm

Ojalá Collective
Thursday October 19, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Vine Annex 1125 N. Vine. Ave., Tucson AZ

4:00pm

The Translator's Responsibility: A Reading and Discussion by Korean Women Poets
Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Marci Calbretta Cancio-Bello

Marci Calbretta Cancio-Bello

Program Coordinator, Miami Book Fair
MARCI CALABRETTA CANCIO-BELLO is the author of Hour of the Ox (University of Pittsburgh, 2016), which won the 2015 Donald Hall Prize for Poetry and 2016 Florida Book Awards bronze medal, and Last Train to the Midnight Market (Finishing Line Press, 2013). She holds degrees from Fl... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Education North

5:00pm

Dinner Break
Thursday October 19, 2017 5:00pm - 7:00pm
TBA

6:00pm

6:00PM: Othering (collected + projected) by Beth Weinstein and Ana Martínez
Othering (collected)  explores social, political, and spatial othering produced by texts, manifest as enclosures and borders, through creative practices, social engagement, performance and installation. 

Othering is instigated by our research about the internment during WWII of Japanese Americans—in so-called “relocation centers” such as Poston and Gila on Arizona Tribal lands and in Tucson’s former Federal Honor Camp—and the echoing of those historical events in current executive orders that threaten to other citizens, residents and visitors. While Tucson’s prison once held conscientious objectors, little remains today as a historical trace of it or many of the other camps. These were brought into being by President Roosevelt’s 1942 Executive Orders 9066 and 9102 to exclude certain unnamed members of the population from “sensitive” areas.
Our intention, through Othering, is to foreground past blurring of truths, states of anxiety, and misguided judgements that resonate with our current socio-political context. Othering invites conference participants and the public to enter into dialogue during the duration of the event at a pop-up en-counter located in the Poetry Center’s covered patio and/or by digitally collaborating through a website. The dialogue centers around historical and current documents related to equality or racial othering (i.e. executive orders, constitution and amendments, testimonials, tweets and poems). During conference breaks and lunch, participants can select pithy passages or words that resonate or are of concern. We will collect hand redacted, edited, annotated and highlighted prints, digital responses and voice recordings sent back at us. These contributions will construct our ephemeral and performative archive.
At each day’s end, in order to reflect the community’s concerns, questions, curiosity, hopes, and fears, we will make visible a selection of that day’s archive through light and projection in the Poetry Center’s exterior space.

Speakers
avatar for Ana Martínez

Ana Martínez

Performance Scholar & Designer
Ana Martínez, PhD is a performance scholar and designer. Her creations foreground scenography as a medium for social comment, and have been shown in the US, England, Germany, and Mexico. Her chapter about the 2001 march by the Zapatistas to the Zócalo is included in Performan... Read More →
avatar for Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein

Assoc Prof of Architecture, University of Arizona, USA
Beth Weinstein works at the seam between architecture and performance, across scales from drawing to installation, to urban and landscape interventions. Her doctoral project  (University of Tasmania) explores “Spatial Labour: Manifesting the hidden in architectural (un/re)making.&rdquo... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Poetry Center exterior spaces

7:00pm

Introduction to Thinking Its Presence: Prageeta Sharma, Dorothy Wang, TIP Board Members, and the UA Poetry Center staff
Speakers
avatar for Prageeta Sharma

Prageeta Sharma

Professor/President of Thinking Its Presence, University of Montana
Prageeta Sharma was born in Framingham, Massachusetts. Her collections of poetry include Bliss to Fill (2000), The Opening Question (2004), which won the Fence Modern Poets Prize, Infamous Landscapes (2007), and Undergloom (2013). | | Sharma’s honors and awards include a Howar... Read More →
avatar for Dorothy Wang

Dorothy Wang

Associate Professor, Williams College
Dorothy Wang's  monograph Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2013) received the Association for Asian American Studies' award for best book of literary criticism in 2016 and made The New Yorker's list of "The Books We Loved in 2016"; it also garnered honorable mention in the Poetry Foundation's first Pegasus Awards for Criticism (2014). Wang gave the 2015 Leslie Scalapino Lecture in Innovative Poetics at Naropa... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 7:00pm - 7:30pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

7:30pm

Ofelia Zepeda: Introductory Remarks
Moderators
avatar for Prageeta Sharma

Prageeta Sharma

Professor/President of Thinking Its Presence, University of Montana
Prageeta Sharma was born in Framingham, Massachusetts. Her collections of poetry include Bliss to Fill (2000), The Opening Question (2004), which won the Fence Modern Poets Prize, Infamous Landscapes (2007), and Undergloom (2013). | | Sharma’s honors and awards include a Howar... Read More →

Speakers


Thursday October 19, 2017 7:30pm - 8:00pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

8:00pm

Roberto Tejada: Diagonal and Self-Possessed: Group Portrait with Liminal Figures
AV: powerpoint 

Moderators
avatar for Dorothy Wang

Dorothy Wang

Associate Professor, Williams College
Dorothy Wang's  monograph Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2013) received the Association for Asian American Studies' award for best book of literary criticism in 2016 and made The New Yorker's list of "The Books We Loved in 2016"; it also garnered honorable mention in the Poetry Foundation's first Pegasus Awards for Criticism (2014). Wang gave the 2015 Leslie Scalapino Lecture in Innovative Poetics at Naropa... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Roberto Tejada

Roberto Tejada

Roberto Tejada is the author of poetry collections that include Full Foreground (Arizona, 2012), Exposition Park (Wesleyan, 2010), Mirrors for Gold (Krupskaya, 2006), and Todo en el ahora (Libros Magenta, 2015), selected poems in Spanish language translation. He founded and co-edited the... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 8:00pm - 8:45pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

9:00pm

James Thomas Stevens and Trish Salah
Moderators
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart's Traffic (Arktoi Books) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press; AK Press) and Here is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities. Their work has appeared in The Best American Experimental Writing, The... Read More →
avatar for Jena Osman

Jena Osman

Poet from Philadelphia. Books include The Network, Public Figures, and Corporate Relations. I teach at Temple University and am currently living under a stack of ungraded papers.

Speakers
avatar for Trish Salah

Trish Salah

Born in Halifax, Trish Salah is the author of Wanting in Arabic (TSAR 2002, 2013) and Lyric Sexology Vol. 1 (Roof 2014, Metonymy 2017) and co-editor of special issues of Canadian Review of American Studies 35.2 (2005) and TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly 1.4 (2014). The 2013 edition... Read More →
JT

James Thomas Stevens

James Thomas Stevens, Aronhió:ta’s, (Akwesasne Mohawk) attended the Institute of American Indian Arts, Naropa University's Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, and Brown University’s graduate C.W. program. Stevens is the author of eight books of poetry, including, Combing the Snakes from His Hair, Mohawk/Samoa: Transmigrations, A Bridge Dead in the Water, The Mutual Life, Bulle/Chimere, and DisOrient, and has recently finished a new manuscript, The Golden Book. He is a 2000 Whiting Award recipient and teaches in the undergraduate and graduate Creative Writing Programs at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe and he lives in... Read More →


Thursday October 19, 2017 9:00pm - 10:00pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)
 
Friday, October 20
 

8:00am

During Breaks: Othering (collected) by Beth Weinstein and Ana Martínez
Othering (collected)  explores social, political, and spatial othering produced by texts, manifest as enclosures and borders, through creative practices, social engagement, performance and installation. 

Othering is instigated by our research about the internment during WWII of Japanese Americans—in so-called “relocation centers” such as Poston and Gila on Arizona Tribal lands and in Tucson’s former Federal Honor Camp—and the echoing of those historical events in current executive orders that threaten to other citizens, residents and visitors. While Tucson’s prison once held conscientious objectors, little remains today as a historical trace of it or many of the other camps. These were brought into being by President Roosevelt’s 1942 Executive Orders 9066 and 9102 to exclude certain unnamed members of the population from “sensitive” areas.
Our intention, through Othering, is to foreground past blurring of truths, states of anxiety, and misguided judgements that resonate with our current socio-political context. Othering invites conference participants and the public to enter into dialogue during the duration of the event at a pop-up en-counter located in the Poetry Center’s covered patio and/or by digitally collaborating through a website. The dialogue centers around historical and current documents related to equality or racial othering (i.e. executive orders, constitution and amendments, testimonials, tweets and poems). During conference breaks and lunch, participants can select pithy passages or words that resonate or are of concern. We will collect hand redacted, edited, annotated and highlighted prints, digital responses and voice recordings sent back at us. These contributions will construct our ephemeral and performative archive.
At each day’s end, in order to reflect the community’s concerns, questions, curiosity, hopes, and fears, we will make visible a selection of that day’s archive through light and projection in the Poetry Center’s exterior space.

Speakers
avatar for Ana Martínez

Ana Martínez

Performance Scholar & Designer
Ana Martínez, PhD is a performance scholar and designer. Her creations foreground scenography as a medium for social comment, and have been shown in the US, England, Germany, and Mexico. Her chapter about the 2001 march by the Zapatistas to the Zócalo is included in Performan... Read More →
avatar for Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein

Assoc Prof of Architecture, University of Arizona, USA
Beth Weinstein works at the seam between architecture and performance, across scales from drawing to installation, to urban and landscape interventions. Her doctoral project  (University of Tasmania) explores “Spatial Labour: Manifesting the hidden in architectural (un/re)making.&rdquo... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Poetry Center exterior spaces

8:30am

Complimentary coffee
Please join us for coffee/tea! Come on in through the Poetry Center library and exit into the garden through the back door, straight ahead of you as you enter the library. (Reminder: no food or drink allowed in the Poetry Center building; enjoy your hot beverages in the garden only! Thank you for helping us protect our collection.)

Friday October 20, 2017 8:30am - 11:30am
Poetry Center Meditation Garden

9:00am

9:00am

How Do I Sound?
Moderators
SP

Soham Patel

Soham Patel is a Kundiman fellow. Two of her chapbooks, 'and nevermind the storm' (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs), and 'Riva: A Chapter' (kitchen-shy press) came out in 2013. Her work has been featured at Fact-Simile Editions, Copper Nickel, Denver Quarterly and various other places... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Janice Lee

Janice Lee

Assistant Professor, Portland State University
Janice Lee is the author of KEROTAKIS (Dog Horn Press, 2010), Daughter (Jaded Ibis, 2011), Damnation (Penny-Ante Editions, 2013), Reconsolidation (Penny-Ante Editions, 2015), and The Sky Isn’t Blue (Civil Coping Mechanisms, 2016). She writes about the filmic long take, slowness... Read More →
avatar for Maryam Ivette Parhizkar

Maryam Ivette Parhizkar

Graduate Student, Yale University
Maryam Ivette Parhizkar is a poet, scholar and educator in training, and sometimes musician. She has two chapbooks: as for the future (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs, 2016) and pull: a ballad (The Operating System, 2014) . Born and raised in Houston to Salvadoran and Iranian immigr... Read More →
SP

Soham Patel

Soham Patel is a Kundiman fellow. Two of her chapbooks, 'and nevermind the storm' (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs), and 'Riva: A Chapter' (kitchen-shy press) came out in 2013. Her work has been featured at Fact-Simile Editions, Copper Nickel, Denver Quarterly and various other places... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Education North

9:00am

Breaking Fast with Words: Five Years of Poetry-A-Day for Ramadan
Moderators
avatar for Neelanjana Banerjee

Neelanjana Banerjee

Managing Editor, Kaya Press
Neelanjana Banerjee is the Managing Editor of Kaya Press, an independent publishing house dedicated to innovate Asian Pacific American and Asian diasporic literature. She teaches writing with Writing Workshops Los Angeles and in the Asian American Studies Department at UCLA.

Speakers
avatar for Tanzila Ahmed

Tanzila Ahmed

#GoodMuslimBadMuslim podcast
Tanzila Ahmed is an activist, storyteller, and politico based in Los Angeles. She can be heard monthly on the #GoodMuslimBadMuslim podcast and can be read monthly in her Radical Love column. An avid writer, she was a long-time writer for Sepia Mutiny and is published in the anthology Love, Inshallah. Her personal projects include writing about Desi music at Mishthi Music where she co-produced Beats for Bangladesh, making #MuslimVDay Cards and curating images for Mutinous Mind State. Taz also organizes with Bay Area Solidarity Summer and South Asians for Justice... Read More →
avatar for Ramy El-Etreby

Ramy El-Etreby

Ramy El-Etreby is a queer, Muslim, Egyptian American theater artist, writer and educator from Los Angeles, California. His short story "The Ride" appears in the ground-breaking anthology, Salaam, Love: American Muslim Men on Love, Sex, and Intimacy, which Ramy recently developed... Read More →
avatar for Faisal Mohyuddin

Faisal Mohyuddin

English Teacher, Highland Park High School (Illinois)
Author of "The Displaced Children of Displaced Children" (selected by Kimiko Hahn as the winner of the 2017 Sexton Prize in Poetry, forthcoming 2018 from Eyewear Publishing), and of the chapbook "The Riddle of Longing" (Backbone Press, 2017). Educator Adviser to Narrative 4 (www... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Poetry Center Classroom 205 (Alumni Room) Poetry Center

9:00am

Grief-Work: The Poetics of Melancholia and Mourning
Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Kay Ulanday Barrett

Kay Ulanday Barrett

Kay Ulanday Barrett is a poet, performer, and educator, navigating life as a disabled pilipinx amerikan transgender queer in the U.S. with struggle, resistance, and laughter. When The Chant Comes (Topside Heliotrope 2016) is their first collection. K. has been invited to The Whi... Read More →
avatar for Micah Tasaka

Micah Tasaka

Micah Tasaka is a queer mixed Japanese poet from the Inland Empire exploring the intersections of identity, spirituality, gender, sexuality, and recovery from trauma. Their debut full length book of poetry, Expansions, will be out on Jamii Press in the fall of 2017.


Friday October 20, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Vine Annex 1125 N. Vine. Ave., Tucson AZ

9:00am

9:00am

11:00am

Activating the Afterlife
Through conjuring up the “afterlives” of racialized histories, ancestors, and trauma, this panel proposes the “ephemeral archive” as an intimate, active space, dependent on what Jose Esteban Munoz calls “affective reimagination” and indeterminate play, a joining of past and present in view toward a future. As Munoz so passionately archived in his critical work, artists of color have continued to generate futures that are not yet realized, despite the pessimistic political climate for POC and queers. In a time of “posts,” Activating theAfterlife acknowledges that what is past/post is never over, but always in potential. The afterlife offers a conceptual space of “a beyond” while acknowledging the finitude of our present moment, allowing for both hope and mourning. With film footage, video, sedimentary artifact, ritual, and poetry, panelists will improvise and activate archives of past events and performances as a form of thinking our present political moment.

Moderators
avatar for Vidhu Aggarwal

Vidhu Aggarwal

Associate Professor, Rollins College
Born in Ranchi, India, Vidhu Aggarwal grew up in the Southern U.S., primarily in Louisiana and Texas. Her multi-media works in video, poetry, and scholarship are oriented around Bollywood spectacle, carnival, and science fiction. Her poems appeared in the top 25 of 2016 in Boston Review. Her collection of poems The Trouble with Humpdori (2016) received the Editor's Choice Prize from The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective, was a handpicked selection with Small Press Distribution, and was selected by Sundress Publications as one of the best books of 2016. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Black Warrior Review, Chicago Quarterly Review, Juked, [PANK], Pedestal, Sugar House Review, INK BRICK, Project As [I] Am... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Vidhu Aggarwal

Vidhu Aggarwal

Associate Professor, Rollins College
Born in Ranchi, India, Vidhu Aggarwal grew up in the Southern U.S., primarily in Louisiana and Texas. Her multi-media works in video, poetry, and scholarship are oriented around Bollywood spectacle, carnival, and science fiction. Her poems appeared in the top 25 of 2016 in Boston Review. Her collection of poems The Trouble with Humpdori (2016) received the Editor's Choice Prize from The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective, was a handpicked selection with Small Press Distribution, and was selected by Sundress Publications as one of the best books of 2016. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Black Warrior Review, Chicago Quarterly Review, Juked, [PANK], Pedestal, Sugar House Review, INK BRICK, Project As [I] Am... Read More →
GA

Genji Amino

Genji Amino is a poet and doctoral candidate in English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. His archival research focuses on Asian American and African American poetry of the 1960s and 1970s. He directs an annual poetics program outside of Santa Fe, New Mexico, fou... Read More →
avatar for Tonya Foster

Tonya Foster

Assistant Professor, California College of the Arts
avatar for Ruth-Ellen Kocher

Ruth-Ellen Kocher

Professor and Divisional Dean for Arts and Humanities, University of Colorado- Boulder
Ruth Ellen Kocher is the author of seven books, most recently Third Voice (Tupelo Press, 2016), nominated for the 2017 Hurston/Wright Legacy Awards, Ending in Planes (Noemi Press, 2014), Goodbye Lyric: The Gigans and Lovely Gun (Sheep Meadow Press, 2014), domina Un/blued (Tupelo... Read More →
avatar for Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith recently co-edited the anthology Angels of the Americplyse: New Latin@ Writing (Counterpath, 2014). Her most recent poetry collection, Milk and Filth was a finalist for the NBCC. A CantoMundo Fellow, she is the publisher of Noemi Press. Her newest colle... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Poetry Center Conference Room 207 Poetry Center

11:00am

No. 1 Gold: An Ephemeral Archive
How to commemorate an arts collective that no one knew existed?This session reveals and enacts an ephemeral archive of No. 1 Gold, a formative artistic project of three women of color artists, Gabrielle Civil, Madhu H. Kaza & Rosamond S. King, (aka “those black girls and that Indian one”). Active in the late 1990s through the mid 2000s, No 1. Gold was a creative laboratory for race, creative writing, conceptual and performance art. Inspired by artists such as Félix González-Torres,Coco Fusco, and Fred Wilson, No.1 Gold served as a means for its members’ collective self-education and development as writers, performance and conceptual artists, teachers, thinkers and bodies in public space. 

Part panel, part round table, part live art action, our session will comprise: 1. reflections on No 1. Gold; 2. a live conversation / “explosion of the text” that performs a shifting documentation of an archive continually under revision; and 3. an interactive live art action inspired by No 1. Gold values and practices.


Friday October 20, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Education North

11:00am

Writing Towards Radical Love: A Self-Care & Community Care Workshop
Moderators
CL

Cathy Linh Che

Executive Director, Kundiman
Kundiman is dedicated to the creation, cultivation, and promotion of Asian American literature.

Speakers
CL

Cathy Linh Che

Executive Director, Kundiman
Kundiman is dedicated to the creation, cultivation, and promotion of Asian American literature.
avatar for Andrea Gutierrez

Andrea Gutierrez

Writer, Editor, Educator


Friday October 20, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Poetry Center Library

11:00am

Reading Women Closely
Moderators
avatar for Katie Kane

Katie Kane

Associate Professor, University of Montana
Katie Kane is a professor of Cultural Studies, English Literature, and Colonial Studies at the University of Montana. The author of a study on the links between Ireland and Indian Country as they emerge out of a shard history of land appropriation and the use of reserved land, Kane has written an essay about the historical and legal connection between Native American reservations and Guantanamo Bay as they are linked in the 2003 John Yoo... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alan Golding

Alan Golding

Professor of English, University of Louisville
Alan Golding is Professor of English and affiliated faculty in Women’s and Gender Studies and Director of the annual Literature and Culture Conference at the University of Louisville, where he teaches American literature and twentieth- and twenty-first century poetry and poetic... Read More →
avatar for Katie Kane

Katie Kane

Associate Professor, University of Montana
Katie Kane is a professor of Cultural Studies, English Literature, and Colonial Studies at the University of Montana. The author of a study on the links between Ireland and Indian Country as they emerge out of a shard history of land appropriation and the use of reserved land, Kane has written an essay about the historical and legal connection between Native American reservations and Guantanamo Bay as they are linked in the 2003 John Yoo... Read More →
avatar for Kristi Maxwell

Kristi Maxwell

Assistant Professor of English, University of Louisville
Kristi Maxwell is the author of five books of poetry: Realm Sixty-four (Ahsahta Press), Hush Sessions (Saturnalia Books), Re- (Ahsahta), That Our Eyes Be Rigged (Saturnalia), and PLAN/K (Horseless Press). Her scholarly publications include articles on experimental writing practic... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Poetry Center Classroom 205 (Alumni Room) Poetry Center

11:00am

In The Movie Version: Five Writers Remix History, City, and Image--A Kaya Press Reading/Peformance
Moderators
avatar for Neelanjana Banerjee

Neelanjana Banerjee

Managing Editor, Kaya Press
Neelanjana Banerjee is the Managing Editor of Kaya Press, an independent publishing house dedicated to innovate Asian Pacific American and Asian diasporic literature. She teaches writing with Writing Workshops Los Angeles and in the Asian American Studies Department at UCLA.

Speakers

Friday October 20, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

11:00am

The Fetishization of "The People" and Writing and Working with Undocumented, Incarcerated, Institutionalized, and/or Indigenous Poeples
Moderators
avatar for Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela

Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela

and Thread Makes Blanket Press, Community College of Philadelphia
*Professor at the Community College of Philadelphia, which includes teaching college courses in Philadelphia jails and organizing to support undocumented students | *Founder of Thread Makes Blanket press which recently released Dismantle, the VONA anthology | *Fiction Editor... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Nico Amador

Nico Amador

co-editor, Thread Makes Blanket Press
Nico Amador is a writer, educator and community organizer living in Vermont by way of Philadelphia and San Diego. Nico's poetry explores various histories—real and imagined, personal and generational—in an attempt to reconcile the contradictions embedded in his experience a... Read More →
avatar for Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela

Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela

and Thread Makes Blanket Press, Community College of Philadelphia
*Professor at the Community College of Philadelphia, which includes teaching college courses in Philadelphia jails and organizing to support undocumented students | *Founder of Thread Makes Blanket press which recently released Dismantle, the VONA anthology | *Fiction Editor... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 11:00am - 11:50pm
Vine Annex 1125 N. Vine. Ave., Tucson AZ

1:00pm

Lunch Break
Food truck on site from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm: Kababeque Xpress

Friday October 20, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
TBA

2:00pm

Troubled Lineage & Genrequeer Form
What is the “ephemera of evidence” (or troubled lineages) from which we as trans/genderqueer/queer makers draw from? What is the relationship amongst experimental aesthetics, speculation and representation in relation to our built structures? How do we consider questions of tradition and belonging within this lineage? This innovative presentation (reading/performance/panel) gathers trans/genderqueer/queer writers/artists/performers/theorists to investigate the genrequeer or cross-genre form in QTPOC cultural production.

Moderators
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart's Traffic (Arktoi Books) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press; AK Press) and Here is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities. Their work has appeared in The Best American Experimental Writing, The... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher is a PhD candidate and instructor in English, Creative Writing, and Women's Studies at the University of Georgia. Recent poems and essays appear in Poetry, Black Warrior Review, The Rumpus, and The Offing.
avatar for Trish Salah

Trish Salah

Born in Halifax, Trish Salah is the author of Wanting in Arabic (TSAR 2002, 2013) and Lyric Sexology Vol. 1 (Roof 2014, Metonymy 2017) and co-editor of special issues of Canadian Review of American Studies 35.2 (2005) and TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly 1.4 (2014). The 2013 edition... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Education North

2:00pm

Living Archives–Decolonizing Institutions, Cultivating Communities. Feat. Smithsonian APAC, KSMoCA, and The Unburden Project
Living Archives–Decolonizing Institutions, Cultivating Communities is a participatory conversation and art experience that explores decolonization strategies for institutions. Feat. socially engaged art projects like KSMoCA (King School Museum of Contemporary Art) in Portland, OR and the Smithsonian APAC Culture Lab Manifesto. Participants are also invited to share in The Unburden Project (a somatic poetry installation co-authored by Taitano and Jarrett and first presented as part of 'Ae Kai--the Smithsonian APAC Culture Lab--on Oahu, Hawai'i in July 2017).

The Unburden Project is generously supported by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Moderators
avatar for Prageeta Sharma

Prageeta Sharma

Professor/President of Thinking Its Presence, University of Montana
Prageeta Sharma was born in Framingham, Massachusetts. Her collections of poetry include Bliss to Fill (2000), The Opening Question (2004), which won the Fence Modern Poets Prize, Infamous Landscapes (2007), and Undergloom (2013). | | Sharma’s honors and awards include a Howar... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis

Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis

Curator, Editor, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
Curator (Asian Pacific American Studies), Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center | Editor, The Asian American Literary Review
avatar for Lisa Jarrett

Lisa Jarrett

Assistant Professor of Community and Context Arts, Portland State University
Lisa Jarrett was born in 1977 in Morristown, New Jersey. Growing up as a Black American who moved with her family to various, often conflicting political climates in cities in Texas, Minnesota, and New York, the influences of her upbringing in a post-Civil Rights and increasingly so-called “post-racial” America are apparent in her work, which seeks to confront ideas of racial difference and perceptions of racial equality. | | Though conflating comparisons of self and Other within a racial context are surely not limited to the American Black Experience and can be examined in myriad global racial milieus, Jarrett’s work is typically centered upon deconstructing, defragmenting, and, in turn, reconstructing and reassembling her personal experiences as a Black woman in America into a visual expression that asks viewers to consider their own roles in present-day race relations. | | Jarrett maintains a studio in Portland, Oregon, where she continues to teach classes in art at Portland State University's School of Art + Design. She exhibits nationally and currently has work in... Read More →
avatar for Lehua Taitano

Lehua Taitano

Lehua M. Taitano, a native Chamoru from Yigo, Guåhan (Guam), is a queer writer and interdisciplinary artist. She is the author of A Bell Made of Stones (poems, TinFish Press) a chapbook of short fiction, appalachiapacific, winner of the 2010 Merriam-Frontier Award, and a chapb... Read More →



Friday October 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Poetry Center Conference Room 207 Poetry Center

2:00pm

Modes of Alteration: Aesthetics of Discomfort and Softening as Brown Heavenly Bodies
Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Kay Ulanday Barrett

Kay Ulanday Barrett

Kay Ulanday Barrett is a poet, performer, and educator, navigating life as a disabled pilipinx amerikan transgender queer in the U.S. with struggle, resistance, and laughter. When The Chant Comes (Topside Heliotrope 2016) is their first collection. K. has been invited to The Whi... Read More →
avatar for Bishakh Som

Bishakh Som

Bishakh Som's work investigates the intersection between image and text, figure and architecture, architecture and landscape. Inspired by the grammar of comics and graphic novels, they seek to expand the vocabulary of the narratives traditionally presented in this medium by explo... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Poetry Center Classroom 205 (Alumni Room) Poetry Center

2:00pm

With What's Handed Down: Radicals, Routes, Reroutes, Responses
Moderators
Speakers
avatar for David Micah Greenberg

David Micah Greenberg

A former organizer with homeless men and women and the advocacy director of a coalition of 90 neighborhood housing organizations in New York City, I now design and evaluate community initiatives for a nonprofit. I wrote Planned Solstice (Iowa) and Kindness (Pressed Wafer, forthco... Read More →
avatar for Ailish Hopper

Ailish Hopper

I'm the author of Dark~Sky Society (New Issues, 2014), and the chapbook, Bird in the Head (Center for Book Arts, 2005). The narrative I'm presenting at TIP in 2017 is from a book of essays (some drawings, some documentation of collaborations in Baltimore), "Vanish into Form," tha... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Poetry Center Library

2:00pm

Minor Key: Sound, Territory, Sign
Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Orlando White

Orlando White

English Faculty, Diné College
Poet Orlando White is from Tółikan, Arizona. He is Diné of the Naaneesht’ézhi Tábaahí and born for the Naakai Diné’e. White is the author of two books of poetry, Bone Light (Red Hen Press), which Kazim Ali described as a “careful excavation on language and letters an... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Vine Annex 1125 N. Vine. Ave., Tucson AZ

2:00pm

Readings from Letters to the Future: Black Women, Radical Writing

Editors of the forthcoming anthology Letters to the Future: BLACK Writing/Radical WRITING (Kore Press) propose a panel short reading followed by in-depth discussion focusing on the proliferation of black women writing in expansive, experimental, innovate, inquiring, prophetic, and profane forms/un-forms. 


Moderators
avatar for Dawn Lundy Martin

Dawn Lundy Martin

Professor and Co-Director of CAAPP, University of Pittsburgh
Dawn Lundy Martin was awarded the Cave Canem Poetry Prize for her first poetry collection, A Gathering of Matter/A Matter of Gathering. Her second book, DISCIPLINE, was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the Lambda Literary Award. Her third collection of poems, L... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Erica Hunt

Erica Hunt

Parsons Family Professor of Creative Writing, Long Island University--Brooklyn
Erica Hunt is the author of Local History, Arcade, Piece Logic, A Day and Its Approximates, & Time Slips Right Before Your Eyes. With Dawn Lundy Martin, she co-edited the anthology Letters to the Future, Radical Writing by Black Women. Hunt is the Parsons Family Professor of Crea... Read More →
avatar for Dawn Lundy Martin

Dawn Lundy Martin

Professor and Co-Director of CAAPP, University of Pittsburgh
Dawn Lundy Martin was awarded the Cave Canem Poetry Prize for her first poetry collection, A Gathering of Matter/A Matter of Gathering. Her second book, DISCIPLINE, was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the Lambda Literary Award. Her third collection of poems, L... Read More →
HM

Harryette Mullen

Harryette Mullen's poetry collection Recyclopedia (Graywolf 2006) won a PEN Beyond Margins Award in 2007. Her previous book, Sleeping with the Dictionary (University of California, 2002) was a finalist for a National Book Award, National Book Critics Circle Award, and Los Angeles... Read More →
avatar for Wendy S. Walters

Wendy S. Walters

Author, MULTIPLY/DIVDE: ON THE AMERICAN REAL AND SURREAL
Wendy S. Walters is the author of a book of prose, Multiply/Divide: On the American Real and Surreal (Sarabande Books, 2015), named a best book of the year by Buzzfeed, Flavorwire, Literary Hub, The Root, and Huffington Post. She is also the author of two books of poems, Troy, Michigan (Futurepoem, 2014) and Longer I Wait, More You Love Me. She has been awarded fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow in Poetry, The Ford Foundation, The Smithsonian Institution, Bread Loaf, The MacDowell Colony, and Yaddo. Her work appears in Bookforum, FENCE... Read More →
avatar for Lillian Yvonne-Bertram

Lillian Yvonne-Bertram

Assistant Professor of Creative Writing, UMASS Boston
LILLIAN-YVONNE BERTRAM is a 2017-2018 recipient of a Harvard University Woodberry Poetry Room Creative Grant, and a 2014 National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Poetry Fellowship. Her third book, _Personal Science_ is available from Tupelo Press. Her first book, _But a S... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

4:00pm

Two Roundtables: Writing With Humor In The Face of Sorrow & Lyric Writing and White Supremacy
Two rountable discussins in prose and poetry. 

Moderators
avatar for Prageeta Sharma

Prageeta Sharma

Professor/President of Thinking Its Presence, University of Montana
Prageeta Sharma was born in Framingham, Massachusetts. Her collections of poetry include Bliss to Fill (2000), The Opening Question (2004), which won the Fence Modern Poets Prize, Infamous Landscapes (2007), and Undergloom (2013). | | Sharma’s honors and awards include a Howar... Read More →
avatar for Dorothy Wang

Dorothy Wang

Associate Professor, Williams College
Dorothy Wang's  monograph Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2013) received the Association for Asian American Studies' award for best book of literary criticism in 2016 and made The New Yorker's list of "The Books We Loved in 2016"; it also garnered honorable mention in the Poetry Foundation's first Pegasus Awards for Criticism (2014). Wang gave the 2015 Leslie Scalapino Lecture in Innovative Poetics at Naropa... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Julie Iromuanya

Julie Iromuanya

Assistant Professor, University of Arizona
JULIE IROMUANYA is the author of Mr. and Mrs. Doctor (Coffee House Press), a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award, the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction, the Etisalat Prize for Literature, and the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize for Debut Fiction. Her scholarly-critical work is forthcoming in Meridians, Callaloo, and Afropolitan Literature as World Literature. She was the inaugural Herbert W. Martin Fellow in Creative Writing at the University of Dayton. She has also been a Jane Tinkham Broughton Fellow in Fiction at Bread Loaf Writers Conference, a Tennessee Williams Scholar at the Sewanee Writers Conference, a Bread Loaf Bakeless / Camargo France Fellow, a Brown Foundation Fellow at the Dora Maar House, and a Jan Michalski Fellow at... Read More →
avatar for Jess Row

Jess Row

Jess Row is the author of the novel Your Face in Mine (2014) and two collections of short stories, Nobody Ever Gets Lost (2011) and The Train to Lo Wu (2005). His fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Granta, Tin House, and many other venues, and he's a frequent c... Read More →
avatar for Prageeta Sharma

Prageeta Sharma

Professor/President of Thinking Its Presence, University of Montana
Prageeta Sharma was born in Framingham, Massachusetts. Her collections of poetry include Bliss to Fill (2000), The Opening Question (2004), which won the Fence Modern Poets Prize, Infamous Landscapes (2007), and Undergloom (2013). | | Sharma’s honors and awards include a Howar... Read More →
avatar for Dorothy Wang

Dorothy Wang

Associate Professor, Williams College
Dorothy Wang's  monograph Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2013) received the Association for Asian American Studies' award for best book of literary criticism in 2016 and made The New Yorker's list of "The Books We Loved in 2016"; it also garnered honorable mention in the Poetry Foundation's first Pegasus Awards for Criticism (2014). Wang gave the 2015 Leslie Scalapino Lecture in Innovative Poetics at Naropa... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Poetry Center Conference Room 207 Poetry Center

4:00pm

Haunted Text, Erasured Body: The Lyric Essay's Ghosts and Shadows
Moderators
avatar for Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher is a PhD candidate and instructor in English, Creative Writing, and Women's Studies at the University of Georgia. Recent poems and essays appear in Poetry, Black Warrior Review, The Rumpus, and The Offing.

Speakers
avatar for Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher is a PhD candidate and instructor in English, Creative Writing, and Women's Studies at the University of Georgia. Recent poems and essays appear in Poetry, Black Warrior Review, The Rumpus, and The Offing.


Friday October 20, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Vine Annex 1125 N. Vine. Ave., Tucson AZ

4:00pm

Recounting Its Presence on the Syllabus: White Imaginaries and Creative Writing Professionalization
Moderators
avatar for Lillian Yvonne-Bertram

Lillian Yvonne-Bertram

Assistant Professor of Creative Writing, UMASS Boston
LILLIAN-YVONNE BERTRAM is a 2017-2018 recipient of a Harvard University Woodberry Poetry Room Creative Grant, and a 2014 National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Poetry Fellowship. Her third book, _Personal Science_ is available from Tupelo Press. Her first book, _But a S... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ali Rachel Pearl

Ali Rachel Pearl

Assistant Lecturer, University of Southern California
Ali Rachel Pearl is currently a PhD student in the Department of English at the University of Southern California where she works in the fields of contemporary literature, electronic literature, and media arts. Her prose, book reviews, photos, and other work can be seen at Pilot... Read More →
avatar for Lillian Yvonne-Bertram

Lillian Yvonne-Bertram

Assistant Professor of Creative Writing, UMASS Boston
LILLIAN-YVONNE BERTRAM is a 2017-2018 recipient of a Harvard University Woodberry Poetry Room Creative Grant, and a 2014 National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Poetry Fellowship. Her third book, _Personal Science_ is available from Tupelo Press. Her first book, _But a S... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Poetry Center Classroom 205 (Alumni Room) Poetry Center

4:00pm

Rememory as Archive: Black Women Writers Remembering as Resistance
Moderators
RP

Rae Paris

Rae Paris is from Carson, California. Her work has been supported by the NEA, the Wurlitzer Foundation, the Hambidge Center, Atlantic Center for the Arts, Hedgebrook, and Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation (VONA). Her book The Forgetting Tree: A Rememory is forthcoming from W... Read More →

Speakers
RP

Rae Paris

Rae Paris is from Carson, California. Her work has been supported by the NEA, the Wurlitzer Foundation, the Hambidge Center, Atlantic Center for the Arts, Hedgebrook, and Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation (VONA). Her book The Forgetting Tree: A Rememory is forthcoming from W... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Education North

4:00pm

Stop Mispronouncing My Name: A Radical Poetics of Brown Bodies in White Spaces
Event Title: "Stop mispronouncing my name" A Radical Poetics of Brown Bodies in White Spaces
Type of Event: Panel - Poetry Craft and Criticism
Panelists: Angel Dominguez, Angela Peñaredondo, Sarah Richards Graba, Amanda Ngoho Reavey

Event Description: This panel seeks to address the poetic publishing community's relationship to marginalized and underrepresented poets of color to ignite a conversation confronting elements of white supremacy within the community, and the radical poetics that emerge from these charged spaces. By discussing our lived experiences of microaggressions, mispronunciations, and white fragility, we hope to address deeper underlying issues and effects of racism & careerism on underprivileged poets and writers of color.

Statement of Merit: The panel is composed of an ethnically and gender diverse collection of writers, editors and artists who believe in the need to address these issues of race within the writing and publishing community as they affect real individuals on a real level. Our work pushes against the norms of US culture that promote systemic racism, sexism, homophobia, classism, etc. We feel this panel represents a vital element of the writing and publishing community discussing a necessary and relevant topic.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Sarah Richards Graba

Sarah Richards Graba

Naropa University
Sarah Richards Graba writes. Recently when asked if she writes poetry or prose, Sarah replied: Yes. Sarah has lived in Colorado her whole life, though her DNA comes from all over the world. She currently teaches writing, research, literature, and pedagogy at Naropa University. Sh... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Ngoho Reavey

Amanda Ngoho Reavey

Woodland Pattern Book Center
Amanda Ngoho Reavey received an MFA in Writing & Poetics from the Jack Kerouac School at Naropa University and is currently the Marketing Director at Woodland Pattern. Her first book, Marilyn, was published by The Operating System in 2015.


Friday October 20, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

4:00pm

To Release:/A Response/-In The Body

TO RELEASE: / A RESPONSE / --IN THE BODY

With Lara Mimosa Montes, Lucas de Lima & Anna Martine Whitehead
Moderated by Samiya Bashir

"How can writing be the place where an interoceptive nervous system is tracked?  The sensorimotor sequence is a sequence of glitches, subtle movements, trembling, voltage — that, in somatic trauma therapies, is: tracked.  So that a sequence can be completed. To release: a response to trauma that has been lodged — as a loop or distortion/contraction — in the body."

 

-Bhanu Kapil

 

In the wake of white nationalism’s global resurgence and a renewed interest in coalition-building, this panel interrogates the recuperative work of artists and writers of color resisting structural entanglements within white supremacy and exposing possibilities within multiracial coalition politics.

 

Through lyric essay, performance, and multimedia, the panel will focus on healing and the urgency of becoming undisciplined. In mapping these far-reaching yet imbricated formations, the panel seeks to both uncover and scramble the intimacy of racial categories, producing a poetics of horizontal relationality whose “opacities” (Glissant) and remakings of subjectivity work to collectivize rather than wish away racial power.


Moderators
avatar for Samiya Bashir

Samiya Bashir

Magician, Reed College
Samiya Bashir’s books of poetry: Field Theories, Gospel, and Where the Apple Falls, and anthologies, including Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art, exist. Sometimes she makes poems of dirt. Sometimes zeros and ones. Sometimes various... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lucas de Lima

Lucas de Lima

PhD student, University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Lara Mimosa Montes

Lara Mimosa Montes

Senior Editor, Triple Canopy
Lara Mimosa Montes is the author of The Somnambulist (Horse Less Press, 2016). She holds a PhD in English from The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Her poems and essays have appeared in BOMB, Boston Review, Fence, The Fanzine, Puerto del Sol, The Third Rail, and els... Read More →



Friday October 20, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Poetry Center Library

5:00pm

Dinner Break
Friday October 20, 2017 5:00pm - 7:00pm
TBA

6:00pm

6:00PM: Othering (collected + projected) by Beth Weinstein and Ana Martínez
Othering (collected)  explores social, political, and spatial othering produced by texts, manifest as enclosures and borders, through creative practices, social engagement, performance and installation. 

Othering is instigated by our research about the internment during WWII of Japanese Americans—in so-called “relocation centers” such as Poston and Gila on Arizona Tribal lands and in Tucson’s former Federal Honor Camp—and the echoing of those historical events in current executive orders that threaten to other citizens, residents and visitors. While Tucson’s prison once held conscientious objectors, little remains today as a historical trace of it or many of the other camps. These were brought into being by President Roosevelt’s 1942 Executive Orders 9066 and 9102 to exclude certain unnamed members of the population from “sensitive” areas.
Our intention, through Othering, is to foreground past blurring of truths, states of anxiety, and misguided judgements that resonate with our current socio-political context. Othering invites conference participants and the public to enter into dialogue during the duration of the event at a pop-up en-counter located in the Poetry Center’s covered patio and/or by digitally collaborating through a website. The dialogue centers around historical and current documents related to equality or racial othering (i.e. executive orders, constitution and amendments, testimonials, tweets and poems). During conference breaks and lunch, participants can select pithy passages or words that resonate or are of concern. We will collect hand redacted, edited, annotated and highlighted prints, digital responses and voice recordings sent back at us. These contributions will construct our ephemeral and performative archive.
At each day’s end, in order to reflect the community’s concerns, questions, curiosity, hopes, and fears, we will make visible a selection of that day’s archive through light and projection in the Poetry Center’s exterior space.

Speakers
avatar for Ana Martínez

Ana Martínez

Performance Scholar & Designer
Ana Martínez, PhD is a performance scholar and designer. Her creations foreground scenography as a medium for social comment, and have been shown in the US, England, Germany, and Mexico. Her chapter about the 2001 march by the Zapatistas to the Zócalo is included in Performan... Read More →
avatar for Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein

Assoc Prof of Architecture, University of Arizona, USA
Beth Weinstein works at the seam between architecture and performance, across scales from drawing to installation, to urban and landscape interventions. Her doctoral project  (University of Tasmania) explores “Spatial Labour: Manifesting the hidden in architectural (un/re)making.&rdquo... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Poetry Center exterior spaces

7:00pm

Thinking Its Presence Board Presents
Moderators
avatar for Prageeta Sharma

Prageeta Sharma

Professor/President of Thinking Its Presence, University of Montana
Prageeta Sharma was born in Framingham, Massachusetts. Her collections of poetry include Bliss to Fill (2000), The Opening Question (2004), which won the Fence Modern Poets Prize, Infamous Landscapes (2007), and Undergloom (2013). | | Sharma’s honors and awards include a Howar... Read More →
avatar for Dorothy Wang

Dorothy Wang

Associate Professor, Williams College
Dorothy Wang's  monograph Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2013) received the Association for Asian American Studies' award for best book of literary criticism in 2016 and made The New Yorker's list of "The Books We Loved in 2016"; it also garnered honorable mention in the Poetry Foundation's first Pegasus Awards for Criticism (2014). Wang gave the 2015 Leslie Scalapino Lecture in Innovative Poetics at Naropa... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Vidhu Aggarwal

Vidhu Aggarwal

Associate Professor, Rollins College
Born in Ranchi, India, Vidhu Aggarwal grew up in the Southern U.S., primarily in Louisiana and Texas. Her multi-media works in video, poetry, and scholarship are oriented around Bollywood spectacle, carnival, and science fiction. Her poems appeared in the top 25 of 2016 in Boston Review. Her collection of poems The Trouble with Humpdori (2016) received the Editor's Choice Prize from The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective, was a handpicked selection with Small Press Distribution, and was selected by Sundress Publications as one of the best books of 2016. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Black Warrior Review, Chicago Quarterly Review, Juked, [PANK], Pedestal, Sugar House Review, INK BRICK, Project As [I] Am... Read More →
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart's Traffic (Arktoi Books) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press; AK Press) and Here is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities. Their work has appeared in The Best American Experimental Writing, The... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Jarrett

Lisa Jarrett

Assistant Professor of Community and Context Arts, Portland State University
Lisa Jarrett was born in 1977 in Morristown, New Jersey. Growing up as a Black American who moved with her family to various, often conflicting political climates in cities in Texas, Minnesota, and New York, the influences of her upbringing in a post-Civil Rights and increasingly so-called “post-racial” America are apparent in her work, which seeks to confront ideas of racial difference and perceptions of racial equality. | | Though conflating comparisons of self and Other within a racial context are surely not limited to the American Black Experience and can be examined in myriad global racial milieus, Jarrett’s work is typically centered upon deconstructing, defragmenting, and, in turn, reconstructing and reassembling her personal experiences as a Black woman in America into a visual expression that asks viewers to consider their own roles in present-day race relations. | | Jarrett maintains a studio in Portland, Oregon, where she continues to teach classes in art at Portland State University's School of Art + Design. She exhibits nationally and currently has work in... Read More →
avatar for Farid Matuk

Farid Matuk

Assistant Professor, University of Arizona
avatar for Lehua Taitano

Lehua Taitano

Lehua M. Taitano, a native Chamoru from Yigo, Guåhan (Guam), is a queer writer and interdisciplinary artist. She is the author of A Bell Made of Stones (poems, TinFish Press) a chapbook of short fiction, appalachiapacific, winner of the 2010 Merriam-Frontier Award, and a chapb... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

8:00pm

Urayoan Noel: "Is Queer Afro-Latin@ Poetics a Thing?"
Moderators
avatar for Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith recently co-edited the anthology Angels of the Americplyse: New Latin@ Writing (Counterpath, 2014). Her most recent poetry collection, Milk and Filth was a finalist for the NBCC. A CantoMundo Fellow, she is the publisher of Noemi Press. Her newest colle... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Urayoan Noel

Urayoan Noel

Urayoán Noel is the author of six books of poetry, most recently Buzzing Hemisphere/Rumor Hemisférico (University of Arizona Press) and the performance text EnUncIAdOr (Editora Educación Emergente). His other works include the critical study In Visible Movement: Nuyorican Poetry from the Sixties to... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 8:00pm - 8:45pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

9:30pm

Fodder
Moderators
SD

Steve Dickison

Director, The Poetry Center, San Francisco State University

Speakers
avatar for Val Jeanty

Val Jeanty

Haitian electronic music composer/percussionist/turntablist, Val Jeanty evokes the musical esoteric realms of the creative subconscious. She incorporates her African Haitian Musical traditions into the present and beyond, combining acoustics with electronics and the archaic with... Read More →
avatar for Douglas Kearney

Douglas Kearney

Douglas Kearney has published six books, most recently, California Book Award Finalist, Buck Studies (Fence Books, 2016), of which Amaud Jamaul Johnson writes: “Seriously, a marvel. I recommend entering Buck Studies at midnight, only after listening to Public Enemy’s Fear of a Black... Read More →


Friday October 20, 2017 9:30pm - 10:30pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)
 
Saturday, October 21
 

8:00am

During Breaks: Othering (collected) by Beth Weinstein and Ana Martínez
Othering (collected)  explores social, political, and spatial othering produced by texts, manifest as enclosures and borders, through creative practices, social engagement, performance and installation. 

Othering is instigated by our research about the internment during WWII of Japanese Americans—in so-called “relocation centers” such as Poston and Gila on Arizona Tribal lands and in Tucson’s former Federal Honor Camp—and the echoing of those historical events in current executive orders that threaten to other citizens, residents and visitors. While Tucson’s prison once held conscientious objectors, little remains today as a historical trace of it or many of the other camps. These were brought into being by President Roosevelt’s 1942 Executive Orders 9066 and 9102 to exclude certain unnamed members of the population from “sensitive” areas.
Our intention, through Othering, is to foreground past blurring of truths, states of anxiety, and misguided judgements that resonate with our current socio-political context. Othering invites conference participants and the public to enter into dialogue during the duration of the event at a pop-up en-counter located in the Poetry Center’s covered patio and/or by digitally collaborating through a website. The dialogue centers around historical and current documents related to equality or racial othering (i.e. executive orders, constitution and amendments, testimonials, tweets and poems). During conference breaks and lunch, participants can select pithy passages or words that resonate or are of concern. We will collect hand redacted, edited, annotated and highlighted prints, digital responses and voice recordings sent back at us. These contributions will construct our ephemeral and performative archive.
At each day’s end, in order to reflect the community’s concerns, questions, curiosity, hopes, and fears, we will make visible a selection of that day’s archive through light and projection in the Poetry Center’s exterior space.

Speakers
avatar for Ana Martínez

Ana Martínez

Performance Scholar & Designer
Ana Martínez, PhD is a performance scholar and designer. Her creations foreground scenography as a medium for social comment, and have been shown in the US, England, Germany, and Mexico. Her chapter about the 2001 march by the Zapatistas to the Zócalo is included in Performan... Read More →
avatar for Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein

Assoc Prof of Architecture, University of Arizona, USA
Beth Weinstein works at the seam between architecture and performance, across scales from drawing to installation, to urban and landscape interventions. Her doctoral project  (University of Tasmania) explores “Spatial Labour: Manifesting the hidden in architectural (un/re)making.&rdquo... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Poetry Center exterior spaces

8:30am

Complimentary coffee
Please join us for coffee/tea! Come on in through the Poetry Center library and exit into the garden through the back door, straight ahead of you as you enter the library. (Reminder: no food or drink allowed in the Poetry Center building; enjoy your hot beverages in the garden only! Thank you for helping us protect our collection.)

Saturday October 21, 2017 8:30am - 11:30am
Poetry Center Meditation Garden

9:00am

Culpable Ignorance: Surrendering White Innocence
Moderators
avatar for TC Tolbert

TC Tolbert

TC Tolbert often identifies as a trans and genderqueer feminist, collaborator, dancer, and poet but really s/he’s just a human in love with humans doing human things. The author of Gephyromania (Ahsahta Press 2014) and 3 chapbooks, TC is also co-editor (along with Trace Peterso... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Beth Alvarado

Beth Alvarado

I am the author of Anthropologies: A Family Memoir (University of Iowa Press) and Not a Matter of Love and other stories (New Rivers Press.) I have lived in the Sonoran Borderlands for most of my life. My late husband was Mexican-American and I’ve been a member of his large fa... Read More →
avatar for Robin Messing

Robin Messing

Robin Messing is a poet, fiction writer, occasional essayist, vocalist, educator and educational coach. Her short story, “Drive-by” was a 2011 nominee for a Pushcart Prize. She is the author of a novel, Serpent in the Garden of Dreams, and two poetry chapbooks, From Temporary... Read More →
avatar for Lisa O'Neill

Lisa O'Neill

Lisa M. O'Neill is a writer, educator, singer/songwriter, and creative usher committed to social justice and moving through the world with authenticity and compassion. Originally from New Orleans, she has lived in Tucson for a decade where she writes into issues of social justice... Read More →
avatar for TC Tolbert

TC Tolbert

TC Tolbert often identifies as a trans and genderqueer feminist, collaborator, dancer, and poet but really s/he’s just a human in love with humans doing human things. The author of Gephyromania (Ahsahta Press 2014) and 3 chapbooks, TC is also co-editor (along with Trace Peterso... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Poetry Center Classroom 205 (Alumni Room) Poetry Center

9:00am

Everywhere It is Other: Love in Landscapes of Surveillance
Moderators
avatar for Youna Kwak

Youna Kwak

Youna Kwak was born in Seoul, Korea. She now teaches and writes in Southern California.

Speakers

Saturday October 21, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Poetry Center Library

9:00am

The Gutta Collective

 

 


Speakers
avatar for Eloisa Amezcua

Eloisa Amezcua

Eloisa Amezcua's debut collection, From the Inside Quietly, is the inaugural winner of the Shelterbelt Poetry Prize selected by Ada Limón. She is the author of three chapbooks and the founder and editor of The Shallow Ends: A Journal of Poetry.
avatar for Rashaad Thomas

Rashaad Thomas

Co-Founder/ Poet, Gutta' Collective
The Gutta' Collective is a Phoenix community poetry group committed to sharing a Black, Brown, and Indigenous narrative through art and poetry in hopes to give a voice to the silent, isolated, and marginalized.


Saturday October 21, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Vine Annex 1125 N. Vine. Ave., Tucson AZ

9:00am

Imagining in the Flesh: Bridging Aesthetics of Love & Liberation
Moderators
avatar for Anita Huslin

Anita Huslin

Anita Rivera Huslin is an award-winning editor, reporter and writer at such news organizations as NPR, The New York Times and The Washington Post, where she was a Pulitzer Prize finalist and wrote, among other subjects, about the intersection of business and the economy and minor... Read More →

Speakers
NO

Nicole Oxendine

Is an interdisciplinary artist, activist & cultural producer, I express through visual art (textile assemblage, painting & site/context-responsive installations), community-engaged practice, poetry & collaborative cultural production. Listening & following the creative whisper... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Education North

9:00am

Rashida Braggs * Tracie Morris: Two Performances/Discussions of Work
Two performances

Braggs:  "Performing African Diaspora with/as Angelique Kidjo"
Morris: “Strong, Demanding Love”: The performance of graduate program-building at its roots
 


Saturday October 21, 2017 9:00am - 10:50am
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

11:00am

The Raced Pronoun

This panel is in response to the 2015 AWP panel entitled, “I Am We As You Are Me: Exploring Pronouns In Experimental Poetry,” where the question of whether pronouns are raced was discussed. This hybrid performance seeks to explore questions of intersections of race, diaspora, embodiment and language through Asian American responses to pronoun shifts and usage which evoke the bodily materiality of language and identity in multiple selves and contexts. What does it mean, as Sara Ahmed writes, to “live it” in everyday situations?


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart's Traffic (Arktoi Books) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press; AK Press) and Here is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities. Their work has appeared in The Best American Experimental Writing, The... Read More →
avatar for Jai Dulani

Jai Dulani

Jai Dulani is a queer writer and multimedia artist who has worked for racial and gender justice at the intersections of LGBTQ, youth, immigrant justice and anti-violence movements for over a decade in New York City. He is a Kundiman Asian American Poet Fellow, a VONA/Voices Fello... Read More →
SP

Soham Patel

Soham Patel is a Kundiman fellow. Two of her chapbooks, 'and nevermind the storm' (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs), and 'Riva: A Chapter' (kitchen-shy press) came out in 2013. Her work has been featured at Fact-Simile Editions, Copper Nickel, Denver Quarterly and various other places... Read More →
avatar for Bishakh Som

Bishakh Som

Bishakh Som's work investigates the intersection between image and text, figure and architecture, architecture and landscape. Inspired by the grammar of comics and graphic novels, they seek to expand the vocabulary of the narratives traditionally presented in this medium by explo... Read More →



Saturday October 21, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Poetry Center Classroom 205 (Alumni Room) Poetry Center

11:00am

Writing/Talking/Teaching The Racial Ephemera
As the moderator of the panel, my talk will introduce the panel as an inquiry into the nature of pedagogy for teachers concerned with the Racial Imaginary, but specifically for teachers who are artists, to bring artistic process into the creation of a pedagogy, and the struggle with doing so in institutions that generally do not support artistic process. To consider pedagogy this way is not to teach inclusivity and diversity, but to model it, not to control the discussion by “the beak of the ego,” rather to use the piano keys and puzzle pieces and letters and words and various other building possibilities to push, not like a hurricane, but like an ant making tracks, building something out of bits, without reference to hierarchies and systems. The musical composition, “Steps,” by Cecil Taylor, beckons us to listen to what happens, without pushing us into any kind of preconceived listening. It begins in freedom, and proceeds as though it is as natural as anything to build a world out of what materials one has. I explore the possibilities of building a pedagogy that responds to the racial imaginary in the way a musician or artist finds meaning as one goes. The materials of my investigation as to how to build such a pedagogy are such things as free jazz and my own poetry, as well as that of others.

Charles AlexanderDirector, Chax Press

Moderators
avatar for Charles Alexander

Charles Alexander

Poet & Press Director, Chax Press & Univ of Houston-Victoria
Poet & artist/bookmaker/printer & teacher, at Univ of Houston-Victoria Center for the Arts, where Chax Press (which I direct and founded in 1984) is located (only since Sept 2015), along with partner, painter Cynthia Miller. Author of Pushing Water -- what does that mean? Water a... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Charles Alexander

Charles Alexander

Poet & Press Director, Chax Press & Univ of Houston-Victoria
Poet & artist/bookmaker/printer & teacher, at Univ of Houston-Victoria Center for the Arts, where Chax Press (which I direct and founded in 1984) is located (only since Sept 2015), along with partner, painter Cynthia Miller. Author of Pushing Water -- what does that mean? Water a... Read More →
avatar for Carla Billitteri

Carla Billitteri

Associate Professor of English // NPF Editorial Collective, University of Maine at Orono
I teach modern and contemporary poetry, poetics, hermeneutics and critical theory at the University of Maine at Orono where I am also a member of the editorial collective of The National Poetry Foundation. Currently at work on a project on dialogical identity practices and the so... Read More →
avatar for Janice Lee

Janice Lee

Assistant Professor, Portland State University
Janice Lee is the author of KEROTAKIS (Dog Horn Press, 2010), Daughter (Jaded Ibis, 2011), Damnation (Penny-Ante Editions, 2013), Reconsolidation (Penny-Ante Editions, 2015), and The Sky Isn’t Blue (Civil Coping Mechanisms, 2016). She writes about the filmic long take, slowness... Read More →
avatar for Tyrone Williams

Tyrone Williams

Professor, Xavuer University
literature, theory, poetry


Saturday October 21, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Vine Annex 1125 N. Vine. Ave., Tucson AZ

11:00am

11:00am

Unmaking the Great Man: Re-theorizing Ambition
Moderators
avatar for Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher is a PhD candidate and instructor in English, Creative Writing, and Women's Studies at the University of Georgia. Recent poems and essays appear in Poetry, Black Warrior Review, The Rumpus, and The Offing.

Speakers
avatar for Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher is a PhD candidate and instructor in English, Creative Writing, and Women's Studies at the University of Georgia. Recent poems and essays appear in Poetry, Black Warrior Review, The Rumpus, and The Offing.
KH

Kamden Hilliard

Graduate Fellow, The University of Iowa
Kamden Hilliard is an American Studies scholar who holds a BA in American Studies from The University of Hawaii at Manoa, where they completed a senior thesis in neoliberal nationalist aesthetics and rhetoric. They are a Graduate Fellow in poetry at the Iowa Writers' Workshop whe... Read More →
avatar for Lillian Yvonne-Bertram

Lillian Yvonne-Bertram

Assistant Professor of Creative Writing, UMASS Boston
LILLIAN-YVONNE BERTRAM is a 2017-2018 recipient of a Harvard University Woodberry Poetry Room Creative Grant, and a 2014 National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Poetry Fellowship. Her third book, _Personal Science_ is available from Tupelo Press. Her first book, _But a S... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Poetry Center Library

11:00am

Essays of the Self, Pedagogy, and Movement
(Changed this from Friday to Saturday--Participants I hope it's okay?) Please insert your abstracts here. 

Moderators
Speakers
CM

Christina M Camarena

University of Nevada, Reno
I'm a 3rd year MFA fiction student at the University if Nevada, Reno. I primarily write literary realism and poetry. I've also been teaching English and Women's Studies at the university for over a decade.
RC

Raj Chakrapani

Adjunct Instructor, The University of Iowa
Raj Chakrapani was born in Delhi, Iowa. He is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and will join the Cinematic Arts program at the University of Iowa next year. Currently he teaches a course in Creative Writing and New Media and works for Arts Share and the International Wr... Read More →
avatar for Beth Kwiatek

Beth Kwiatek

Beth Kwiatek identifies more as a scribbler than a writer. She has written op-ed articles for The Buffalo News on white privilege and racism. While living in Lexington, KY she designed and edited the catalogue for the "Wall of Memories: Las Desaparecidas de Ciudad Juarez", an... Read More →
ST

Suiyi Tang

suiyi lives in the scopophilic corridor. she is a comparative literature and american studies double major at williams college. on hiatus, in favor of an untwisted bildungsroman (not to be made into an independent film) and an archive of ballpoints and lingerie. a gallery of her... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Education North

11:00am

Presences and Readings
Moderators
AS

Aya Satoh

University of Montana

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Abi-Karam

Andrea Abi-Karam

Andrea Abi-Karam is a gq punk poet cyborg writing on the art of killing bros, the intricacies of cyborg bodies & delayed healing. Their first book EXTRATRANSMISSION is forthcoming from Kelsey Street Press early 2018. Commune Editions published Andrea’s recent chapbook THE A... Read More →
avatar for Sherwin Bitsui

Sherwin Bitsui

Sherwin Bitsui is the author of Flood Song (Copper Canyon Press) and Shapeshift (University of Arizona Press). He Diné is of the Bįį’bítóó’nii’ Tódi’chii’nii clan and is born for the Tlizilłani’ clan. He is from White Cone, Arizona on the Navajo Reservation. His honors include the 2011 Lannan Literary Fellowship, a Native Arts... Read More →
avatar for Teré Fowler Chapman

Teré Fowler Chapman

Founder, H O P E e t c.
Words on the Avenue's founder, Teré Fowler-Chapman is a gender fluid writer, activist, and playwright—by way of sonoran desert | by way of boot's bayou. This poet was the first African American executive director of the Tucson Poetry Festival. This poet's first flash play, "In... Read More →
avatar for Sawako Nakayasu

Sawako Nakayasu

Assistant Professor, Brown University
Sawako Nakayasu is a transnational poet, translator, and occasional performance artist who has lived in Japan, France, China, and the US. Her books include The Ants (Les Figues Press, 2014), Texture Notes (Letter Machine Editions, 2010), and the translation of The Collected Poems of Chika Sagawa (Canarium Books, 2015), as well as unconventional translations such as Costume en Face (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2015), a handwritten notebook of Tatsumi... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 11:00am - 12:50pm
Poetry Center Conference Room 207 Poetry Center

1:00pm

Book Fair
Come browse books by Thinking Its Presence registrants and attendees, organized and administered by Krystal Languell. Book fair will be available during lunch and dinner breaks on Saturday; books by Thinking Its Presence keynote presenters will (in some cases, additionally) be available during the keynote evenings for sale by the UA Bookstore.

Volunteers

Saturday October 21, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Poetry Center exterior spaces

1:00pm

Lunch Break
Food truck on site from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm: DC Jumbie Latin Caribbean

Saturday October 21, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
TBA

2:00pm

Intersecting Lineages: A Kundiman Reading
Event Description
Kundiman is a nonprofit organization that serves Asian American writers. Kundiman creates an affirming and rigorous space where Asian American writers can explore, through art, the unique challenges that face the new and ever changing diaspora. We see the arts as a tool of empowerment, of education and liberation, of addressing proactively what legacy we will leave for our future generations. 

In this reading, five Asian American writers, Michelle Chan Brown, Chen Chen, Jennifer S. Cheng, Jai Dulani, and Jane Wong, will begin by reading work by ancestor writers who are considered outside of their self-identified racial and/ or ethnic community/-ities. Following this, the writers will share their own work which highlights this kind of productive hybrid cross-community fertilization. 

Moderators
CL

Cathy Linh Che

Executive Director, Kundiman
Kundiman is dedicated to the creation, cultivation, and promotion of Asian American literature.

Speakers
CL

Cathy Linh Che

Executive Director, Kundiman
Kundiman is dedicated to the creation, cultivation, and promotion of Asian American literature.
avatar for Chen Chen

Chen Chen

I'm the author of WHEN I GROW UP I WANT TO BE A LIST OF FURTHER POSSIBILITIES, winner of the A. Poulin, Jr. Poetry Prize and forthcoming spring 2017 from BOA Editions, Ltd. My work has previously appeared in two chapbooks and journals like Poetry, The Massachusetts Review, and Dr... Read More →
avatar for Jane Wong

Jane Wong

Jane Wong's poems can be found in anthologies and journals such as The Pushcart Prize Anthology XLII, Best American Poetry 2015, Best New Poets 2012, The American Poetry Review, Pleiades, Third Coast, and others. Her essays have appeared in Tin House and CutBank. A Kundiman fello... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

2:00pm

Addressing Structural Racism
Addressing Structural Racism in Creative Writing Programs
Event Description:
Often times we think that diversifying the pool of students or faculty will make a creative writing more inclusive. This panel of writers, some of whom teach in big public universities and some who teach at small elite colleges, will discuss some of the institutional and structural barriers to inclusive programs. We will look at both graduate and undergraduate creative writing programs and consider financial, curricular, programmatic and pedagogical frameworks that by nature disproportionately exclude students of color. It is our hope to initiate a conversation with attendees that can highlight some of the major issues and generate creative approaches and/or alternative structures.
 
Justification:
A diverse and inclusive creative writing classroom is vital to the success of that classroom as well as a vital part of addressing larger social and political issues surrounding race. Yet students of color are badly underrepresented in the average creative writing classroom. In one undergraduate creative writing program, for example, in the 2014-2015 academic year students of color—who made up around 20% of the college’s undergraduates—made up 6% of the students majoring in creative writing. In 2015-2016 year, they were around 10% of students majoring in creative writing. Most writers of color have had the experience of teaching workshops in which there were only one or two students of color, and sometimes there were none.
 
We all know that the issues around student of color enrollment in higher education are more than skin deep, but if anything that makes the issue of inclusivity even more pressing. The cultural and racial homogeneity of creative writing programs is self-perpetuating. Some of the issues surrounding low enrollment of students of color in both undergraduate and graduate creative writing programs is social and cultural, but some of it is structural and pedagogical.
 
We will propose several solutions to address inclusivity, including pedagogical, curricular, structural and programmatic.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Ruth-Ellen Kocher

Ruth-Ellen Kocher

Professor and Divisional Dean for Arts and Humanities, University of Colorado- Boulder
Ruth Ellen Kocher is the author of seven books, most recently Third Voice (Tupelo Press, 2016), nominated for the 2017 Hurston/Wright Legacy Awards, Ending in Planes (Noemi Press, 2014), Goodbye Lyric: The Gigans and Lovely Gun (Sheep Meadow Press, 2014), domina Un/blued (Tupelo... Read More →
avatar for Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith recently co-edited the anthology Angels of the Americplyse: New Latin@ Writing (Counterpath, 2014). Her most recent poetry collection, Milk and Filth was a finalist for the NBCC. A CantoMundo Fellow, she is the publisher of Noemi Press. Her newest colle... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Poetry Center Conference Room 207 Poetry Center

2:00pm

Composition of a Tear: Writing Grief and Violence through the Latinx Body/Imagination
Speakers
avatar for Natalie Scenters-Zapico

Natalie Scenters-Zapico

Lecturer, University of Nebraska
Natalie Scenters-Zapico is a fronteriza from the sister cities of El Paso, Texas, USA and Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua, México. She is the author of The Verging Cities (Center for Literary Publishing 2015) and Lima :: Limón, forthcoming (Copper Canyon Press).


Saturday October 21, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Vine Annex 1125 N. Vine. Ave., Tucson AZ

2:00pm

2:00pm

Common Coordinates: Translation, Explorations, Travel, and Transmissions
Speakers
avatar for Matthew Baker

Matthew Baker

Matthew Baker currently lives in Reno, NV and is an MFA candidate in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Nevada, Reno. Some of his work has appeared or will appear in Yemassee Journal, Elke, The Meadow, and Clover, a Literary Rag, among others. When not teach... Read More →
avatar for Yanara Friedland

Yanara Friedland

Yanara Friedland is a German-American writer, translator, and teacher. Her first book, Uncountry: A Mythology was the winner of the 2015 Noemi Press Fiction award. “Abraq ad Habra: I will Create As I Speak,” a digital chapbook, is available from Essay Press. She is the recip... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 2:00pm - 3:50pm
Poetry Center Library

4:00pm

Insider and Outsider Perspectives: Documenting Transracial American Indian Adoption
Writer/Director/Producer Brooke Swaney and Producer/Subject Kendra Mylnechuk examine American Indian identity, transracial adoption and translating the interior narrative. Select scenes will be screened from their feature-length documentary for audience feedback and discussion.

Moderators
avatar for Brooke Swaney

Brooke Swaney

Brooke Pepion Swaney (Amskapipiikuni, Selish descendent) is a film director and writer, who received her M.F.A. in Film and Television from Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. Swaney is a 2014 NACF Film Fellow, a 2013 Time Warner Fellow, a 2012 Sundance Institute Native Fellow, writer/director of OK Breathe Auralee (2012 Sundance Film Festival), producer of Bella Vista (2014 Rotterdam), and writer/director/editor of "I am Human" the 2016 Native Outreach ad for the Bernie Sanders Presidential... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kendra Mylnechuk

Kendra Mylnechuk

Kendra Mylnechuk, co-Creator, Actress (Mother Bison): Kendra is a Native American (Lummi) actor, theatre artist, teaching artist, director and producer. She currently lives in Missoula, MT. Her film performances have screened at Sundance, Tribeca, SXSW, and other festivals around... Read More →
avatar for Brooke Swaney

Brooke Swaney

Brooke Pepion Swaney (Amskapipiikuni, Selish descendent) is a film director and writer, who received her M.F.A. in Film and Television from Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. Swaney is a 2014 NACF Film Fellow, a 2013 Time Warner Fellow, a 2012 Sundance Institute Native Fellow, writer/director of OK Breathe Auralee (2012 Sundance Film Festival), producer of Bella Vista (2014 Rotterdam), and writer/director/editor of "I am Human" the 2016 Native Outreach ad for the Bernie Sanders Presidential... Read More →



Saturday October 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Poetry Center Library

4:00pm

Two Performances: Samiya Bashir & Randa Jarrar; Sophia Terazawa
Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Samiya Bashir

Samiya Bashir

Magician, Reed College
Samiya Bashir’s books of poetry: Field Theories, Gospel, and Where the Apple Falls, and anthologies, including Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art, exist. Sometimes she makes poems of dirt. Sometimes zeros and ones. Sometimes various... Read More →
avatar for Randa Jarrar

Randa Jarrar

Author, HIM, ME, MUHAMMAD ALI
Randa Jarrar’s new book, Him, Me, Muhammad Ali, won the Story Prize Spotlight Award and the American Book Award. Her first novel, A Map of Home, was published in half a dozen languages & won a Hopwood Award, an Arab-American Book Award, and was named one of the best novels of 2... Read More →
avatar for Sophia Terazawa

Sophia Terazawa

Poet, University of Arizona
Sophia Terazawa is the author of I AM NOT A WAR (Essay Press).



Saturday October 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

4:00pm

5:00pm

Book Fair
Come browse books by Thinking Its Presence registrants and attendees, organized and administered by Krystal Languell. Book fair will be available during lunch and dinner breaks on Saturday; books by Thinking Its Presence keynote presenters will (in some cases, additionally) be available during the keynote evenings for sale by the UA Bookstore.

Volunteers

Saturday October 21, 2017 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Poetry Center exterior spaces

5:00pm

Dinner Break
Saturday October 21, 2017 5:00pm - 7:00pm
TBA

6:00pm

6:00PM: Othering (collected + projected) by Beth Weinstein and Ana Martínez
Othering (collected)  explores social, political, and spatial othering produced by texts, manifest as enclosures and borders, through creative practices, social engagement, performance and installation. 

Othering is instigated by our research about the internment during WWII of Japanese Americans—in so-called “relocation centers” such as Poston and Gila on Arizona Tribal lands and in Tucson’s former Federal Honor Camp—and the echoing of those historical events in current executive orders that threaten to other citizens, residents and visitors. While Tucson’s prison once held conscientious objectors, little remains today as a historical trace of it or many of the other camps. These were brought into being by President Roosevelt’s 1942 Executive Orders 9066 and 9102 to exclude certain unnamed members of the population from “sensitive” areas.
Our intention, through Othering, is to foreground past blurring of truths, states of anxiety, and misguided judgements that resonate with our current socio-political context. Othering invites conference participants and the public to enter into dialogue during the duration of the event at a pop-up en-counter located in the Poetry Center’s covered patio and/or by digitally collaborating through a website. The dialogue centers around historical and current documents related to equality or racial othering (i.e. executive orders, constitution and amendments, testimonials, tweets and poems). During conference breaks and lunch, participants can select pithy passages or words that resonate or are of concern. We will collect hand redacted, edited, annotated and highlighted prints, digital responses and voice recordings sent back at us. These contributions will construct our ephemeral and performative archive.
At each day’s end, in order to reflect the community’s concerns, questions, curiosity, hopes, and fears, we will make visible a selection of that day’s archive through light and projection in the Poetry Center’s exterior space.

Speakers
avatar for Ana Martínez

Ana Martínez

Performance Scholar & Designer
Ana Martínez, PhD is a performance scholar and designer. Her creations foreground scenography as a medium for social comment, and have been shown in the US, England, Germany, and Mexico. Her chapter about the 2001 march by the Zapatistas to the Zócalo is included in Performan... Read More →
avatar for Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein

Assoc Prof of Architecture, University of Arizona, USA
Beth Weinstein works at the seam between architecture and performance, across scales from drawing to installation, to urban and landscape interventions. Her doctoral project  (University of Tasmania) explores “Spatial Labour: Manifesting the hidden in architectural (un/re)making.&rdquo... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Poetry Center exterior spaces

7:00pm

TIP BOARD READING & RASA REFLECTION
Speakers
avatar for Tisa Bryant

Tisa Bryant

Director, MFA Creative Writing Program, Co-Director, Equity & Diversity, California Institute of the Arts
Tisa Bryant makes work that often traverses the boundaries of genre, culture and history, with an enduring fascination with fusing critical and creative writing through the other arts into distinctive registers and new forms. She is the author of Unexplained Presence, a collecti... Read More →
avatar for Anita Huslin

Anita Huslin

Anita Rivera Huslin is an award-winning editor, reporter and writer at such news organizations as NPR, The New York Times and The Washington Post, where she was a Pulitzer Prize finalist and wrote, among other subjects, about the intersection of business and the economy and minor... Read More →
avatar for Ruth-Ellen Kocher

Ruth-Ellen Kocher

Professor and Divisional Dean for Arts and Humanities, University of Colorado- Boulder
Ruth Ellen Kocher is the author of seven books, most recently Third Voice (Tupelo Press, 2016), nominated for the 2017 Hurston/Wright Legacy Awards, Ending in Planes (Noemi Press, 2014), Goodbye Lyric: The Gigans and Lovely Gun (Sheep Meadow Press, 2014), domina Un/blued (Tupelo... Read More →
avatar for Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith recently co-edited the anthology Angels of the Americplyse: New Latin@ Writing (Counterpath, 2014). Her most recent poetry collection, Milk and Filth was a finalist for the NBCC. A CantoMundo Fellow, she is the publisher of Noemi Press. Her newest colle... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

8:00pm

Patricia Spears Jones: Reading
Arkansas born and raised; resident of New York City for more than four decades, Patricia Spears Jones is the recipient of The Jackson Poetry Prize, one the most prestigious awards for American Poets via Poets & Writers, Inc.  

Spears Jones was named in Essence.com as one of its “40 Poets They Love” in 2010. She  is author of the poetry collections: Painkiller and Femme du Monde from Tia Chucha Press and The Weather That Kills from Coffee House Press and five chapbooks including Living in the Love Economy. Her fourth collection: A Lucent Fire: New and Selected Poems is out from White Pine Press (White Pine Press Distinguished Poets series) which features her 2016 Pushcart Prize winning poem, “Etta James at the Audubon Ballroom.”  She was a finalist for the Paterson Poetry Prize from the Poetry Society of America and the Paterson Prize from the Passaic County Community College, which was won by her Vermont College advisor, Mark Doy. Her work is widely anthologized. In 2015 she received a Barbara Deming Memorial Fund award for her memoir in progress. She is the editor of “The Future Differently Imagined”, an issue of About Place Journal, the online publication of Black Earth Institute and was editor and contributor to the blog project: Thirty Days Hath September: Another Kind of Noise (www.blackearthinstitute.org) (2012) and a 2016 version; Think: Poems for Aretha Franklin’s Inauguration Day Hat(www.bombsite.org ) (2009)  and co-editor of the long out of print, ground-breaking anthology Ordinary Women: An Anthology of Poetry by New York City Women (1978).  She also published W.B.#1 a mimeo magazine which included works by Lee Breuer, Robin Messing, Larry Eigner, Bill Kushner, Levi Frazier, Jr. and Ted Greenwald in 1975.
Spears Jones has been a culture maven for four decades. She was the first African American programmer as Program Coordinator at The Poetry Project at St. Mark’s Church where two decades later she served as Mentor for Emerge, Surface, Be, a new fellowship program. She ran the esteemed New Works Program for the Massachusetts Council of Arts and Humanities (1989-1991) and was Director of Planning and Development at The New Museum of Contemporary Art (1994-96).  She is also actively involved in a variety of formal and informal organizations involved with progressive politics, social justice, feminism, the environment, and multi-culturalism, best seen in her appointment as Senior Fellow for The Black Earth Institute.  She curates WORDS SUNDAY, a literary and performance series focused on Brooklyn based writers and artists. She teaches for CUNY.
She served on the boards of Mabou Mines, the Poetry Project at St. Mark’s Church and Artsgarden l0cated in Holland.   Her cultural commentary at www.tribes.org BombThe Poetry Project NewsletterBlack Issues Book ReviewThe Boston Globe, and Essence and www.Essence.com. She has also written catalogue essays for diverse artists including Jane Dickson, Rhonda Schaller and Rick (Richard J.) Powell.   “Cosmopolitan in Brooklyn” ran from 2006-2009 in Calabar Magazine and she is a contributing editor to Bomb Magazine where interviews with Cornelius Eady and Ida Applebroog were published along with articles on  Carl E. Hazlewood, Tony Medina, El Anatsui, Wesley Brown and forthcoming with Emma Amos.  For tribes, she has published reviews and commentaries on Yuko Otomo,  Toni Morrison, Dawoud Bey, Carrie Mae Weems, and Tonya M. Foster.  She has been interviewed television broadcast by AFTV, radio broadcasts bt Neil Silberblatt and DuEwa Frazier.  Interviews with Rochelle Spencer for Mosaic Magazine and Poets & Writers,  Lewis Warsh for www.theottter.org,  and Barbara Henning for the Poetry Project Newsletter are published and in a video document at Furious Flower Poetry Center in a conversation with Afaa Michael Weaver.


Moderators
avatar for Prageeta Sharma

Prageeta Sharma

Professor/President of Thinking Its Presence, University of Montana
Prageeta Sharma was born in Framingham, Massachusetts. Her collections of poetry include Bliss to Fill (2000), The Opening Question (2004), which won the Fence Modern Poets Prize, Infamous Landscapes (2007), and Undergloom (2013). | | Sharma’s honors and awards include a Howar... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Patricia Spears Jones

Patricia Spears Jones

Patricia Spears Jones is a Brooklyn-based African American poet and author of A Lucent Fire: New and Selected Poems from White Pine Press and seven other collections and chapbooks who is the Jackson Poetry Prize winner for 2017 and a 2016 Pushcart Prize winner; a recipient of a B... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 8:00pm - 9:00pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)

9:00pm

The Buffalo

The Buffalo is a re-imagined outcome of a true story of a baby bison's encounter with humans. In the summer of 2016, a baby bison was euthanized by the park service in Yellowstone National Park after well-meaning tourists put the calf in the back of their SUV to protect it from the cold. It was 39 degrees outside. The bison, after experiencing human contact, was rejected by its mother and herd, imprinted on cars and humans, and tried to nurse on exhaust pipes, causing a danger to itself and other people.

The story of "The Buffalo" is a devised theatre piece told from the bison calf and his mother's perspective. It takes place in part in a prison cell, where the bison and his mother appear to the tourist-turned-prisoner repeatedly. We plan to utilize youtube home videos of people's trips to Yellowstone, shadow puppets, music and movement, as well as dialogue to investigate the story. The piece is an exploration of society's strained relationship with nature and the consequences of losing that connection. Through magical realism, we intend to ask our audience to examine our connection-or lack thereof-to nature, and the consequence of well meaning but misguided attempts to control or fix it.

Through this story, we are also exploring other forms of alienation: specifically relationships between Indigenous Americans and the colonialism of America, consumption and consumerism, fast fashion, mother child relationships, and technology's role in our human connections. Tonally, we intend for the piece to dwell in a slightly alienated humor.

We at MT+NYC Collaborative are deeply interested in both rural and urban audiences: how they are similar, how they are different, and where the universal human experience lies. We seek to utilize the audience as a lense to explore these facets of a story.  The participants at TIP are a fantastic demographic of academically minded fellow artists to provide feedback, and would be a unique opportunity for us to meet artists from both urban and rural communities in a single setting.   


Moderators
avatar for Brooke Swaney

Brooke Swaney

Brooke Pepion Swaney (Amskapipiikuni, Selish descendent) is a film director and writer, who received her M.F.A. in Film and Television from Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. Swaney is a 2014 NACF Film Fellow, a 2013 Time Warner Fellow, a 2012 Sundance Institute Native Fellow, writer/director of OK Breathe Auralee (2012 Sundance Film Festival), producer of Bella Vista (2014 Rotterdam), and writer/director/editor of "I am Human" the 2016 Native Outreach ad for the Bernie Sanders Presidential... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kendra Mylnechuk

Kendra Mylnechuk

Kendra Mylnechuk, co-Creator, Actress (Mother Bison): Kendra is a Native American (Lummi) actor, theatre artist, teaching artist, director and producer. She currently lives in Missoula, MT. Her film performances have screened at Sundance, Tribeca, SXSW, and other festivals around... Read More →


Saturday October 21, 2017 9:00pm - 10:00pm
Theater at Poetry Center (Rubel Room)